Campeonatos rápido y relámpago en Noruega

14/01/2016 – Magnus Carlsen no participó pero Jon Ludvig Hammer y el nuevo gran talento noruego Tari Aryan sí estuvieron presentes. A comienzos de enero se disputó el Campeonato de Noruega Abierto de Ajedrez Rápido y Relámpago en Frederikstad. Hammer ganó la prueba de mayor velocidad y Aryan se coronó campeón en la modalidad un poco más pausada. Reportaje por Holger Blauhut...

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Hammer y Aryan aprovechan la ocasión

El Campeonato de Noruega Individual Absoluto suele disputarse en verano. El abierto de ajedrez rápido y relámpago, sin embargo, se disputa en enero. En los últimos años, dicho campeonato casi siempre se disputó en Frederikstad. (El año pasado, sin embargo fue en Drammen. En esta ocasión, a pesar de las nevadas muchísimos jugadores consiguieron llegar al lugar del encuentro. En total participaron 154 jugadores en campeonato de ajedrez relámpago y 240 en el de ajedrez rápido. El auge que se ha creado gracias a los éxitos de Magnus Carlsen sigue funcionando.

Aryan y Hammer en acción

Ambos torneos se dipsutaron en tres grupos: A, B (Elo>1750)  y C (Elo>1250)

Los favoritos Jon Ludvig Hammer, Normunds Miezis (LAT) y Aryan Tari (16 años) acudierond directamente desde Estocolmo, donde habían participado en la Copa Rilton.

Jon Ludvig Hammer comenzó el campeonato relámpago con 7 puntos en las primeras 7 partidas (entre otras cosas triunfó frente a Tari). A continuación sufrió una derrota contra el joven maestro internacional Johan-Sebastian Christiansen. Con otra victoria más en la última ronda, Hammer se aseguró el oro (8/9) por delante de Tari y Christiansen (ambos sumaron 7/9).

Los campeones del grupo A

Los campeones del grupo B

Los campeones del grupo C

La partida entre Hammer y Tari

[Event "Norwegian Rapid Championship"] [Site "?"] [Date "2016.01.10"] [Round "7"] [White "Hammer, Jon Ludvig"] [Black "Tari, Aryan"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A35"] [WhiteElo "2695"] [BlackElo "2556"] [Annotator "Aryan, Tari"] [PlyCount "86"] [EventDate "2016.??.??"] [EventType "rapid"] 1. Nf3 c5 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nc3 g6 4. e3 Nf6 5. d4 cxd4 6. exd4 d5 7. cxd5 Nxd5 8. Qb3 e6 9. Bb5 Bg7 10. O-O O-O 11. Bxc6 bxc6 12. Na4 Qc7 {This posistion has arisen three times before. All the games have been played by Grandmasters.} 13. Nc5 $146 (13. Bd2 {The move that happened in all the games} Ne7 $5 $146 { Black wants to move his knight to f5 to arrange counterplay against the d4-pawn.} (13... Rb8 14. Qa3 {Played successfully by Nepomniachtchi recently against Areschenko in European teams.} (14. Qc2 {is also possible})) 14. Rac1 Nf5 15. Qc3 Rd8 16. Be3 a5 $13 {is a possible line}) 13... Rb8 {Seemed logical to improve the rook and gain a tempo on the queen.} 14. Qd1 {Came as a surprise. Based on the games I've seen White usually puts the queen on c2 or a3 in these variatons.} (14. Qa3 Nb4 $5) 14... Ne7 {I played this move instantly. My plan was basically go to f5 with the knight and start pressing on d4.} (14... Rd8 {was also possible}) 15. Nd3 $5 Nd5 (15... Rb5 $1 {was more to prefer, but I didn't like White getting in Bf4, but Black seems to have no problems after:} 16. Bf4 Qd8 {and Black still have the easy plan on Nf5 and it is difficult for White to defend the d4-pawn in a comfortabel way. For instance:} 17. Be5 (17. Rc1 Nf5 $15) 17... f6 18. Bg3 g5 $1 $15 {Where things have gone wrong for White.}) 16. Re1 Rd8 17. Bg5 {Provoking a weakness before playing Bd2.} f6 18. Bd2 Bf8 19. Rc1 {So far both of us have done quite natural moves. In this posistion I thought for some minutes and found it difficult to find a plan. The way Black usually gets counterplay is by the pawn breaks e5 or c5, but here White is controlling everything.} Rb5 {I want to play a5 and basically ask White how he is going to improve his posistion.} ( {I refused} 19... a5 {In account of} 20. Qa4 Rb5 $2 21. Qxb5 $1 cxb5 22. Rxc7 Nxc7 23. Bxa5 $18) 20. b3 a5 21. a4 Rb8 22. Nc5 Kf7 $2 {I thought this move was natural to defend the e6-pawn in this way. But the king is just misplaced on f7 in many variatons! For instance:} (22... Re8 {was a better move. The game is about unclear, but the posistion should be more easy to play with White. He has more space and nice coordination of the pieces.} 23. h4 Qb6 24. h5 g5 $1) 23. h4 $14 {Also strong. White should basically try to arrange an attack.} (23. g4 $1 {would punish me. Threatening the deadly g5!} g5 24. h4 h6 25. Rc4 $16) 23... Qb6 {Trying to get counterplay by threatening Bxc5 followed by Qxb3 in some variatons.} 24. Nh2 $2 {This move surprised me, and is a big mistake. The knight was perfectly placed on f3 and there was no reason to remove it.} (24. h5 {White should have continued pushing his pawn, and the posistion is difficult for Black.} Bxc5 (24... e5 25. Ne4 Qxb3 26. Qe2 $18) 25. Rxc5 Qxb3 26. Qe2 $1 $40 {Just ignoring the queen on b3 and planning Qe4, where the queen joins the attack against Black's king.}) 24... e5 $1 $15 { This now works as White misplaced his knight.} 25. Ng4 $6 (25. Rc4 $1 {was much stronger} exd4 26. Qc1 {And White has compensation. But of course difficult to find such moves under the pressure in rapid.}) 25... exd4 26. Ne4 Qxb3 (26... c5 $1 $17 {Would have also been strong and just keeps a healthy pawn up.}) 27. Qe2 $6 (27. Ngxf6 $1 Nxf6 28. Nxf6 Qxd1 29. Rexd1 Bb4 {But still Black is having a large advantage.}) 27... Bf5 $6 (27... d3 28. Qf3 Bxg4 29. Qxg4 f5 {simple} 30. Ng5+ Kg8 $19 {Where Black is just two pawns up, with no compensation for White.}) 28. Rxc6 Re8 $2 29. Nh6+ $4 {After this move White is just lost.} (29. Ngxf6 $1 Nxf6 30. Rxf6+ Kg7 31. Rxf8 $1 {What I missed} Kxf8 (31... Rxf8 32. Nd6 $18 {Where Black cannot defend his king without giving material.}) 32. Bh6+ Ke7 $1 {looks extremely dangrous, but White has no useful checks with the knight.} 33. Rc1 Rb6 $13 {with unclear play }) 29... Kg7 30. f3 Bb4 31. Qf2 Bxe4 32. fxe4 Bxd2 33. Qxd2 Qg3 $1 34. Ng4 (34. exd5 $2 Rxe1+) 34... Rb2 $1 35. Qxb2 Qxe1+ 36. Kh2 Qxh4+ 37. Kg1 Qe1+ 38. Kh2 Qh4+ 39. Kg1 Qxg4 40. exd5 Qd1+ 41. Kh2 Qh5+ 42. Kg1 Re1+ 43. Kf2 Qh4+ { This was a very important win for me to have the chance of becoming the champion :)} 0-1

Clasificación final del Campeonato de Noruega de ajedrez relámpago

# Nombre Elo Nor. Elo Club Puntos promedio FIDE Rendimiento
IM Aryan Tari Vålerenga
8,0
2395
 2614 ( +0)
IM Frode Olav Olsen Urkedal 1911
8,0
2340
 2565 ( +0)
GM Jon Ludvig Hammer OSS
7,5
2390
 2567 ( +0)
IM Johan-Sebastian Christiansen Vålerenga
7,0
2326
 2452 ( +0)
FM Lars Oskar Hauge OSS
7,0
2250
 2375 ( +0)
GM Kjetil A. Lie Asker
6,5
2375
 2465 ( +0)
FM Sebastian Mihajlov OSS
6,5
2373
 2464 ( +0)
IM Atle Grønn OSS
6,5
2325
 2373 ( +0)
GM Normunds Miezis  
6,5
2304
 2395 ( +0)
10 
IM Eirik Gullaksen Bergens
6,5
2298
 2353 ( +0)
11 
Andreas G Tryggestad Nordstrand
6,0
2265
 2284 ( +0)
12 
IM Erik Fossan Stavanger
6,0
2229
 2276 ( +0)
13 
IM Maxim L Devereaux Black Knights
6,0
2171
 2209 ( +0)
14 
FM Jøran Aulin-Jansson Asker
6,0
2163
 2170 ( +0)
15 
FM Ole Christian Moen OSS
6,0
2134
 2153 ( +0)
16 
Håkon Bentsen Molde
6,0
2131
 2141 ( +0)
17 
Isak Sjøberg Nordstrand
6,0
2101
 2149 ( +0)
18 
FM Petter Fossan Stavanger
5,5
2268
 2278 ( +0)
19 
Holger Blauhut Fredriksstad
5,5
2168
 2161 ( +0)
19 
Vegar Koi Gandrud Hønefoss
5,5
2168
 2169 ( +0)

(Hasta 55 participantes)

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