Tablas ginebrinas en el duelo caucásico

09/07/2017 – Tras 2 rondas muy fuertes con ajedrez de lucha y muchas partidas decantadas, era inevitable que se produjese una jornada más tibia y eso fue lo que sucedió en la ronda 3 del torneo de Ginebra del Grand Prix de la FIDE. De las 9 partidas, solo 2 terminaron con resultados decantados, aunque Pentala Harikrishna debió lamentar mucho la oportunidad que tuvo de ganar a Shakhriyar Mamedyarov. La partida ha sido analizada por Alber Silver. La victoria de Eljanov sobre Nepomniachtchi la ha diseccionado Krikor Mekhitarian.

ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14  Download

Programa de gestión de bases de datos de ajedrez que es referencia mundial. Todos usan ChessBase, desde el campeón del mundo al aficionado. Inicie su historia de éxito personal con ChessBase.

Más información...

Ronda 3

Resultados

Tab. Tít. Nombre País Elo Resultado Tít Nombre País Elo
1 GM Levon Aronian
 
2809 ½ - ½ GM Teimour Radjabov
 
2724
2 GM Penteala Harikrishna
 
2737 ½ - ½ GM Shakhriyar Mamedyarov
 
2800
3 GM Michael Adams
 
2736 ½ - ½ GM Alexander Grischuk
 
2761
4 GM Anish Giri
 
2775 ½ - ½ GM Chao B Li
 
2735
5 GM Peter Svidler
 
2749 ½ - ½ GM Boris Gelfand
 
2728
6 GM Pavel Eljanov
 
2739 1 - 0 GM Ian Nepomniachtchi
 
2742
7 GM Ernesto Inarkiev
 
2707 ½ - ½ GM Yifan Hou
 
2666
8 GM Richard Rapport
 
2694 0 - 1 GM Dmitrij Jakovenko
 
2703
9 GM Alexander Riazantsev
 
2654 ½ - ½ GM AR Saleh Salem
 
2638

El tablero que aparecía más intrigante a priori era en el que se enfrentaban Levon Aronian y el líder Teimor Radjabov. Las declaraciones de ambos en relación al conflicto entre sus dos países había añadido aspectos extradeportivos al encuentro. Para todas esas espectativas, la partida resultó bastante corta. Radjabov escogió una Bogoindia y tras maniobras agresivas en el flanco de rey, se dieron la mano. Una pena, pues parecía que las negras podían aspirar a más y haber continuado.

Pavel Eljanov lleva 3 de 3 partidas decantadas: 2 victorias y 1 derrota. Tuvo una fascinante batalla contra Ian Nepomniachtchi en la ronda 3

Pavel Eljanov - Ian Nepomniachtchi comentada por Krikor Mekhitarian

[Event "FIDE GP"] [Site "Geneva"] [Date "2017.07.08"] [Round "3"] [White "Eljanov, Pavel"] [Black "Nepomniachtchi, Ian"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B92"] [WhiteElo "2739"] [BlackElo "2742"] [Annotator "Mekhitarian, Krikor"] [PlyCount "79"] [EventDate "2017.07.06"] [EventType "swiss"] [EventRounds "9"] [EventCountry "SUI"] [SourceDate "2017.07.08"] [SourceVersionDate "2017.07.08"] {3rd round of the Geneva FIDE GP and Radjabov is the only player at 2/2, while everybody else is trying to catch him!} 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Be2 $5 {A move that has a positional reputation, but may create complicated and agressive positions, as we will see in the game!} e5 7. Nb3 Be7 8. Be3 Be6 9. Nd5 Nbd7 {threatening to take on e4} (9... Nxd5 $5 { keeping the bishop is another way to play this} 10. exd5 Bf5 11. Qd2 { important to avoid Bg5 once for all} (11. a4 {was played in the oldest game I found with this quick Nd5 idea: back in 1945!} Nd7 12. a5 Bg5 $1 {and Black is already confortable, the e3 bishop is an important piece} 13. Bg4 Bxe3 14. Bxf5 Ba7 $1 15. Qg4 g6 16. Bxd7+ Qxd7 17. Qxd7+ Kxd7 18. c4 Rhc8 19. Nd2 f5 $15 { and black is simply better: 0-1 (43) Stulik,V-Opocensky,K Prague 1945}) 11... O-O 12. O-O Bg6 13. a4 $1 (13. Rac1 $6 {I played this move in a game, but didn't get any advantage} a5 $1 14. a4 Nd7 15. Bb5 f5 16. f4 (16. f3 $5 { was better}) 16... Nf6 17. g3 Ng4 18. c3 Bf6 (18... Be8 $1 $15 {would be very annoying, threatening to take and play a4. If I take on e8, then I have problems controlling the queen-side properly (Rxe8! and Qc7 with Qc4 ideas)}) 19. Rce1 h5 20. Qe2 Nxe3 21. Qxe3 h4 22. Nd2 $11 {1/2-1/2 (36) Mekhitarian,K (2550)-Oparin,G (2617) Abu Dhabi 2016}) 13... Nd7 14. a5 h6 15. c4 Rc8 16. Rac1 {and White had great play on the queen-side in this game} e4 $6 (16... Re8 { should be better}) 17. Qb4 Qc7 18. Rfd1 Nc5 19. Bf4 Bg5 20. Bxg5 hxg5 21. Nxc5 dxc5 22. Qd2 $16 {following with either b4 or Rc3-Rb3-Rb6, ½-½ (45) Di Berardino,D (2494)-Leitao,R (2636) Joao Pessoa 2013}) (9... Nxe4 $2 {is simply bad} 10. Bb6 Qc8 11. Nc7+ Kf8 12. Nxa8 Nd7 13. Be3 $16) 10. Qd3 O-O (10... Bxd5 11. exd5 O-O 12. g4 $1 {The idea seen in Eljanov's game was found and tried for the first time by Alexander Khalifman in the round of 16 of the FIDE World Championship back in 1999, against one of the world's best Najdorf specialists - Boris Gelfand. Khalifman used it with success and went on to win the tournament!} Nc5 13. Nxc5 dxc5 14. O-O-O e4 15. Qd2 Bd6 16. g5 Nd7 17. h4 Ne5 18. h5 {and the scary pawn avalanche comes with deadly effects} Rc8 $2 ( 18... f5 $1 {was the only chance to survive} 19. gxf6 Qxf6 20. Rhg1 $16) 19. Rh4 $1 c4 {Gelfand tries a direct counterplay by sacrificing two pawns, but White takes the material and remains well defended} 20. Rxe4 c3 21. bxc3 Qa5 22. Kb1 Rxc3 23. Bd4 $18 {1-0 (39) Khalifman,A (2628)-Gelfand,B (2713) Las Vegas 1999}) 11. a4 $5 {a flexible move, that is almost alway useful in this variation} (11. O-O {is the most common move here} Bxd5 12. exd5 Ne8 (12... Rc8 $5 {threatening Nb6} 13. c4 Ne8 14. Rac1 (14. g3 $5 Bg5 15. f4 exf4 16. gxf4 $13 {with an unclear position}) 14... b6 15. Kh1 (15. Bg4 $5) 15... Bg5 16. Qd2 Bxe3 17. Qxe3 a5 18. Nd2 f5 $15 {and Black got a perfectly fine position: 0-1 (52) Dastan,B (2519)-Saric,I (2618) Minsk 2017}) (12... Nb6 $6 13. c4 a5 14. a4 $1 Nfd7 15. Bd2 $1 {hitting a5} Nc5 16. Nxc5 dxc5 17. Bc3 Bd6 18. b3 $16 { and White has a clear plan to play Rae1, Bd1-Bc2, with amazing prospects on the kingside}) 13. a4 Bg5 14. a5 Bxe3 15. Qxe3 Nef6 16. c4 Rb8 17. Rfb1 Qc7 18. Nd2 $36 {with good potential on the queenside: 1/2-1/2 (59) Carlsen,M (2838)-Vachier Lagrave,M (2803) Karlsruhe 2017}) 11... Bxd5 (11... Nxd5 $5 { has to be tried in future encounters} 12. exd5 e4 $1 {forced and good} 13. Qd2 {looks more logical} (13. Qxe4 Nf6 14. Qd3 Bxd5 15. O-O $13 {White has a better structure, but Black has good activity, the position should be balanced} ) 13... Bf5 14. g4 Bg6 15. h4 h6 {with a very complex position} (15... Bxh4 $2 16. g5 $18) 16. O-O-O (16. g5 $5 h5 17. O-O-O $13) 16... Bxh4 17. Rh3 $40) 12. exd5 Nc5 $6 {a typical move changing the structure, that also stops White to expand the queenside. In the other hand, white obtains a strong passed pawn on d5, and a perfect scenario to play with c4 and g4!, castling queen-side} ({ a similar precedent was:} 12... Rc8 13. a5 Nc5 14. Nxc5 dxc5 15. c4 e4 16. Qc2 Bd6 17. O-O (17. g4 $5 {would be also possible here, like Eljanov played}) 17... Qc7 18. g3 Rce8 19. Rfc1 Nd7 20. b4 f5 $36 {and Black already has a strong initiative: 0-1 (25) Castrillon Gomez,M (2210)-Vazquez,G (2443) Medellin 2017}) (12... Ne8 $1 {preparing f5, has never been tried before, and should be a good move.}) 13. Nxc5 dxc5 14. c4 Qc7 15. Qc2 Rae8 $6 (15... e4 { perhaps should be better, because if White plays the same g4 now, then Black may decide where to place the a8-rook}) 16. g4 $1 $16 {a good moment to play this move, because Black already removed the rook from a8, meaning White will have more freedom do castle queen-side. Also, Black will never be able to expand with f5 anymore, as it usually happens in this pawn structure. White definitely won the opening battle here and has a good advantage} e4 {this had to be played sooner or later} 17. O-O-O Bd6 18. g5 Nd7 19. Kb1 Ne5 20. h4 $1 ( 20. Qxe4 $6 {there is no need to take this pawn, as it helps Black} Nc6 $5 $44 {followed by Nb4. White would also have an advantage here, but black has time to breathe now}) 20... Nf3 21. Rh3 $6 (21. h5 $1 {would be very strong, the problem is that Black only starts the counterplay on the queen-side after white decides to take on f3 (something he will do whenever he wants)} Qd7 ( 21... f6 {is the computer's suggestion, and does not solve all the problems} 22. Bxf3 exf3 23. h6 g6 24. gxf6 Rxf6 25. Rhe1 $16 {and Black has problems defending his king, and at the same time watching the passed 'd' pawn, Bg5 is coming next}) 22. a5 {another problem is that Black can't even play Rb8 for b6, because e4 is hanging} Qc7 23. Bxf3 exf3 24. Bd2 $1 Re2 $2 25. h6 g6 26. Qc3 $18 {followed by Qxf3}) 21... Qd7 $1 {I guess Eljanov missed this. In any case, he is still better} 22. Rhh1 Qe7 (22... f5 23. gxf6 Rxf6 24. h5 $16 {also looks good for white}) 23. Bxf3 exf3 24. h5 b5 $1 {counterplay gets there in time} 25. cxb5 axb5 26. axb5 Qd7 (26... Rb8 $5 $132) 27. Qd3 (27. Rh4 $5 Qxb5 28. h6 g6 29. Bf4 {not an easy move! now Qc3 is real threat, because Be5 is no longer possible} Bxf4 30. Rxf4 f6 $1 31. Rxf3 (31. Rxf6 $2 Rxf6 32. gxf6 Kf7 $3 {and Black has very strong counterplay with Re2 next} (32... Re2 $4 33. f7+ $1 Kxf7 34. Qc3 $18 {with a decisive attack})) 31... Re2 32. Rb3 $1 Rxc2 33. Rxb5 Rxf2 34. gxf6 $16 {should be good for White, but black is fighting}) 27... Rb8 28. h6 g6 (28... Qxb5 $2 29. Qc3 $1 $16) 29. Bd2 Rxb5 30. Bc3 Rb3 31. Rhe1 { preparing Qxf3} (31. Qxf3 $2 Be5 $1 $36 {and Black grabs the initiative}) 31... Qg4 {forced} 32. Re4 Qxg5 (32... Qf5 $5 33. Kc2 Rfb8) 33. Qxf3 Be5 $2 (33... Qxh6 $1 {was necessary} 34. Qf6 Rxc3 {and black is totally in the game, with decent compensation} 35. Qxc3 Qh5 $44 {followed by Qf5}) 34. Rxe5 Qxe5 35. d6 $2 (35. Bxe5 $1 {was winning on the spot} Rxf3 36. Bc7 $18 {followed by d6, should be a very sad endgame for Black}) 35... f6 $1 36. d7 Rxc3 37. Qxc3 Qe7 $2 {probably in severe time-trouble, Ian throws away a study-like defense to draw this very difficult game. In the post-game interview Eljanov said that after 34.Rxe5 Qxe5 35.d6, it was already hopeless for Black, meaning he also did not realize that Black is not losing the rook endgame, which is totally understandable.} (37... Qxc3 $1 38. bxc3 Rd8 {it was very hard to understand that black does not lose this position, with an outside passed pawn for White (since c5 will fall in a few moves)} 39. Kb2 Kf7 40. Kb3 Ke6 41. Kc4 Rxd7 42. Rxd7 Kxd7 43. Kxc5 g5 44. Kd5 (44. Kb6 g4 45. c4 f5 46. Kb7 Kd6 47. Kb6 Kd7 $11 ) (44. f3 Kc7 $1 (44... Ke6 $1 {is also enough}) (44... f5 $2 45. Kd5 g4 46. fxg4 fxg4 47. Ke4 Kc6 48. Kf4 Kc5 49. Kxg4 Kc4 50. Kf5 Kxc3 51. Kf6 Kd4 52. Kg7 Ke5 53. Kxh7 Kf6 {and Black loses by one tempo} 54. Kg8 $18) 45. Kd5 Kd7 46. c4 f5 {now the advance is well-timed, because White already pushed his pawn and Black will be able to grab it and come back in time to the king-side} 47. Ke5 g4 48. fxg4 fxg4 49. Kf4 Kd6 50. Kxg4 Kc5 51. Kf5 Kxc4 52. Kf6 Kd5 53. Kf7 Ke5 54. Kg7 Ke6 55. Kxh7 Kf7 $11) 44... g4 45. Ke4 Ke6 46. c4 f5+ 47. Kf4 Kf6 $1 { provoking the c-pawn} 48. c5 Ke6 49. c6 Kd6 50. Kxf5 Kxc6 51. Kxg4 (51. Kf6 Kd6 52. Kg7 Ke6 53. Kxh7 Kf7 $11) 51... Kd6 52. Kf5 Ke7 $11) 38. Qb3+ Kh8 39. Qd5 $18 {now it's all over} Rd8 40. Rd3 {and Black resigned, because of the Re3 threat. Eljanov moves to 2nd place with 2/3, and Radjabov keeps the sole lead in Geneva with 2,5/3!} (40. Rd3 g5 (40... Qe1+ 41. Ka2 Qa5+ 42. Ra3 $18) 41. Re3 Qxd7 42. Qxd7 Rxd7 43. Re8#) 1-0

A Pentala Harikrishna le faltó un pelo para ganar a Shakhriyar Mamedyarov

Pentala Harikrishna - Shakhriyar Mamedyarov comentada por Albert Silver

[Event "FIDE Geneva Grand Prix 2017"] [Site "Geneva"] [Date "2017.07.08"] [Round "3"] [White "Harikrishna, Pentala"] [Black "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C54"] [WhiteElo "2737"] [BlackElo "2800"] [Annotator "A. Silver"] [PlyCount "67"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d3 a6 6. O-O d6 7. a4 {5} Ba7 8. Re1 O-O 9. h3 b5 (9... Ne7 10. d4 Ng6 11. Nbd2 c6 12. Bd3 Re8 13. Bc2 h6 14. Nf1 exd4 15. cxd4 {1-0 (40) Kramnik,V (2808)-Carlsen,M (2832) Stavanger 2017}) 10. Ba2 $146 (10. Bb3 b4 11. a5 Rb8 12. Nbd2 Be6 13. Bc4 Qc8 14. Bxe6 Qxe6 15. Nc4 Rb5 16. Be3 Bxe3 17. Nxe3 bxc3 18. bxc3 Rxa5 19. Rxa5 Nxa5 20. Qa4 { 1/2-1/2 (20) Shankland,S (2676)-Tari,A (2593) Khanty-Mansiysk 2017}) 10... b4 11. Bg5 Rb8 12. Nbd2 h6 13. Bh4 Be6 14. Bc4 g5 15. Bg3 Na5 16. Bxe6 fxe6 17. d4 bxc3 18. bxc3 Nh5 19. Bh2 exd4 20. cxd4 Nc6 21. Rc1 Qd7 22. Re3 Rb7 23. Nb3 e5 24. Nxe5 dxe5 25. Qxh5 {It is quite clear here that Black is in a world of pain. His king is wide open, Qg6+ is threatened, Rec3 is threatened, and e5 is under pressure as well.} Kh7 26. Rec3 $1 Nxd4 27. Bxe5 ({The best move was} 27. Na5 $1 {as per the computer, but one would need to be very confident no oversight had been made in the main line after} Ne2+ 28. Qxe2 {Forced since both Kh1 and Kf1 lose for White.} Rxf2 29. Qc4 $1 {Probably the move Harikrishna missed, and White is winning.} (29. Qxf2 Bxf2+ 30. Kxf2 Rb2+ 31. Kg1 Qd2 32. Rxc7+ Kg8 {with a draw.})) 27... Rxf2 $2 (27... Nxb3 28. Rc6 $1 $18 ) (27... Ne6 28. Rf3 Qe8) 28. Kh2 $2 ({Not} 28. Kxf2 $2 Nxb3+ 29. Kg3 Nxc1 30. Rc6 $1 Rb3+ 31. Kh2 Rxh3+ $1 32. Qxh3 (32. gxh3 Qd2+ 33. Kg3 Qe1+ 34. Kf3 Qe3+ 35. Kg4 Qxe4+ 36. Kg3 Ne2+ $19) 32... Qxc6 $11) (28. Nc5 $18 {is the winner, cutting off the bishop and thus the threats.} Qf7 (28... Bxc5 29. Rxc5) 29. Qxf7+ Rxf7 30. Bxd4) 28... Ne6 $16 {Keeping tight control over c7.} ({But not} 28... Nxb3 $2 29. Rc6 $18) 29. Rd1 Qe7 ({Avoiding the trap} 29... Qxa4 $2 30. Rf3 $18 Rxf3 31. Qxf3 Qe8 32. Qf5+ Kg8 33. Qf6) 30. Qg4 Qf7 $11 {The danger is mostly past, and Black has now balanced the game with threats of his own.} 31. Rc6 h5 32. Qg3 $1 (32. Qxe6 {[#] leads to mate after} Rxg2+ $3 33. Kh1 Rh2+ $3 34. Kxh2 Qf2+ 35. Kh1 Qf3+ 36. Kh2 Qe2+ 37. Kh1 Qxd1+ 38. Kg2 Qg1+ 39. Kf3 Qf2# ) 32... Rf1 33. Qd3 Rxd1 34. Qxd1 1/2-1/2

La última partida decantada del día la jugaron Richard Rapport y Dmitry Jakovenko. El talento creativo del magiar no sirvió para desestabilizar al ruso, que superó a su rival, tras casi 7 horas de juego.

Partidas de las rondas 1 a 3

 

Clasificación tras la ronda 3

  Elo Rend. Tít. Nombre 1 2 3 Puntos Des1 Des2
1
 
2724 2952 GM Teimour Radjabov 9s1 5w1 2s½ 2.5 / 3    
2
 
2809 2831 GM Levon Aronian 8w½ 12s1 1w½ 2.0 / 3 5.50 14.50
3
 
2737 2820 GM Penteala Harikrishna 16s1 6w½ 4w½ 2.0 / 3 5.00  
4
 
2800 2831 GM Shakhriyar Mamedyarov 11s½ 13w1 3s½ 2.0 / 3 4.50 14.50
5
 
2739 2806 GM Pavel Eljanov 15w1 1s0 14w1 2.0 / 3 4.50 13.50
6
 
2736 2806 GM Michael Adams 17w1 3s½ 7w½ 2.0 / 3 4.50 13.00
7
 
2761 2813 GM Alexander Grischuk 13s½ 18w1 6s½ 2.0 / 3 3.50  
8
 
2735 2767 GM Chao B Li 2s½ 10w½ 9s½ 1.5 / 3 5.00  
9
 
2775 2718 GM Anish Giri 1w0 17s1 8w½ 1.5 / 3 4.50 15.00
10
 
2749 2729 GM Peter Svidler 12w½ 8s½ 11w½ 1.5 / 3 4.50 13.50
11
 
2728 2754 GM Boris Gelfand 4w½ 14s½ 10s½ 1.5 / 3 4.50 13.00
12
 
2703 2738 GM Dmitrij Jakovenko 10s½ 2w0 18s1 1.5 / 3 4.00  
13
 
2707 2645 GM Ernesto Inarkiev 7w½ 4s0 15w½ 1.0 / 3 5.00  
14
 
2742 2638 GM Ian Nepomniachtchi 18s½ 11w½ 5s0 1.0 / 3 4.00 13.50
15
 
2666 2603 GM Yifan Hou 5s0 16w½ 13s½ 1.0 / 3 4.00 13.00
16
 
2654 2586 GM Alexander Riazantsev 3w0 15s½ 17w½ 1.0 / 3 3.50  
17
 
2638 2510 GM AR Saleh Salem 6s0 9w0 16s½ 0.5 / 3 4.50 12.50
18
 
2694 2535 GM Richard Rapport 14w½ 7s0 12w0 0.5 / 3 4.50 11.50

Las retransmisiones

(Mientras estén en marcha las partidas)

Enlace directo a la retransmisión

Se disputará entre el 5 y el 16 de julio. Del total de 24 jugadores seleccionados para disputar la serie del Grand Prix, en Ginebra competirán 18, tanto por los premios, como por los puntos del circuito, cuyos dos mejores clasificados se asegurarán plaza en el Torneo de Candidatos.

El lugar del encuentro será el hotel Richemond, en el centro de la ciudad de Ginebra (Suiza), a orillas del lago del mismo nombre.

Tras los dos primeros torneos del circuito, Shakhriyar Mamedyarov encabeza la general con 280 puntos. Ding Liren figura en la segunda posición con 240 puntos y Alexander Grischuk y Maxime Vachier-Lagrave los siguen con 211,4 puntos cada uno.

World Chess FIDE Grand Prix 2017

El World Chess FIDE Grand Prix 2017 es una serie de 4 torneos de ajedrez que forman parte del circuito del Campeonato del Mundo. Los dos mejores clasificados tendrán plaza en el Torneo de Candidatos 2018.

En cada torneo juegan 18 ajedrecistas. En total participarán 24 jugadores en el circuito y cada jugador participará en 3 torneos en total.

Los torneos se disputarán por sistema suizo a 9 rondas. Los jugadores recibirán 1 punto por victoria, medio punto por las tablas y cero puntos si caen derrotados.

Los puntos de Grand Prix determinarán la clasificación del circuito. Dos jugadores se han clasificado como finalistas del duelo por el Campeonato del Mundo 2016, 4 jugadores han llegado desde las semifinales en la Copa del Mundo 2015, 8 jugadores se han clasificado debido a sus valoraciones Elo, un jugador se ha clasificado a través de los torneos de la ACP y 9 ajedrecistas son designados directamente por Agon y FIDE (Deben tener una valoración Elo superior a 2700 puntos)

La bolsa de premios de cada torneo asciende a 130.000 euros, o sea que la serie de torneos del Grand Prixde totaliza 520.000 euros. 

Clasificación absoluta

# Nombre Elo Sharjah Moscú Ginebra Palma de Mallorca Total
1 Shakhriyar Mamedyarov  2800 140 140 0 0 280
2 Ding Liren  2783 70 170 0 0 240
3 Alexander Grischuk  2761 140 71.4 0 0 211.4
4 Maxime Vachier-Lagrave  2796 140 71.4 0 0 211.4
5 Hikaru Nakamura  2785 70 71.4 0 0 141.4
6 Hou Yifan 2666 7 71.4 0 0 78.4
7 Michael Adams 2736 70 3 0 0 73
8 Ian Nepomniachtchi 2732 70 3 0 0 73
9 Peter Svidler 2756 0 71.4 0 0 71.4
10 Teimour Radjabov  2724 0 71.4 0 0 71.4
11 Anish Giri  2771 0 71.4 0 0 71.4
12 Dmitry Jakovenko 2708 70 0 0 0 70
13 Francisco Vallejo Pons  2717 25 4 0 0 29
14 Richard Rapport 2694 25 0 0 0 25
15 Pavel Eljanov  2739 25 0 0 0 25
16 Li Chao  2720 25 0 0 0 25
17 Evgeny Tomashevsky  2706 3 20 0 0 23
18 Pentala Harikrishna  2737 0 20 0 0 20
19 Boris Gelfand 2728 0 20 0 0 20
20 Jon Ludvig Hammer 2628 3 7 0 0 10
21 Levon Aronian 2793 7 0 0 0 7
22 Salem Saleh    3 3 0 0 6
23 Alexander Riazantsev  2671 1 0 0 0 1
24 Ernesto Inarkiev  2707 0 1 0 0 1

Agon tiene la exclusiva de la retransmisión de las partidas de los torneos del Grand Prix de la FIDE y quiere que el sitio web oficial www.worldchess.com sea el único donde se puedan seguir en directo. Gracias a un acuerdo de colaboración entre Agon y ChessBase, nuestros clientes Premium podrán seguir las partidas en directo en Playchess.com.

Programa

Fecha Hora Actividad
05.07.2017   Inauguración
06.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 1
07.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 2
08.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 3
09.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 4
10.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 5
11.07.2017   Día de descanso
12.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 6
13.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 7
14.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 8
15.07.2017 ?? CEST Ronda 9
    Clausura

Premios y puntuación

Puesto Premio Puntos Grand Prix
1 €20,000 170
2 €15,000 140
3 €12,000 110
4 €11,000 90
5 €10,000 80
6 €9,000 70
7 €8,000 60
8 €7,000 50
9 €6,000 40
10 €5,000 30
11 €4,250 20
12 €4,000 10
13 €3,750 8
14 €3,500 6
15 €3,250 4
16 €3,000 3
17 €2,750 2
18 €2,500 1

En caso de empate, los puntos se repartirían a partes iguales. No hay valoraciones de desempate.

En la clasificación absoluta, los puestos se determinan de la siguiente manera (en caso de empate a puntos):

  1. Puntos por duelos (en los tres torneos jugados)
  2. Cantidad de partidas con negras
  3. Cantidad de partidas ganadas
  4. Cantidad de victorias con negras
  5. Por sorteo

Todas las retransmisiones en Playchess.com a golpe de vista (Guía)

_REPLACE_BY_ADV_1

Fotos: Maria Yassakova (World Chess)

Enlaces


Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Comentar

Normas sobre los comentarios

 
 

¿Aún no eres usuario? Registro