Ginebra: inglesas y dragones acelerados

11/07/2017 – El torneo del Grand Prix de la FIDE ha llegado a su ecuador tras 5 rondas. Tras el día de descanso de hoy, las cuatro rondas que restan resultarán decisivas para los aspirantes a una de las dos plazas que otorga el circuito para estar en el próximo Torneo de Candidatos. Alexander Grischuk derrotó a Pavel Eljanov, alcanzó a Radjabov en el primer puesto y es uno de los aspirantes a ellass. Le ofrecemos la partida analizada por el GM Mekhitarian.

ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14  Download

Programa de gestión de bases de datos de ajedrez que es referencia mundial. Todos usan ChessBase, desde el campeón del mundo al aficionado. Inicie su historia de éxito personal con ChessBase.

Más información...

Ronda 5

Resultados

Tab. Nombre País Resultado Nombre País
1 Shakhriyar Mamedyarov
 
½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov
 
2 Levon Aronian
 
½ - ½ Peter Svidler
 
3 Pavel Eljanov
 
0 - 1 Alexander Grischuk
 
4 Pentala Harikrishna
 
½ - ½ Ian Nepomniachtchi
 
5 Michael Adams
 
½ - ½ Li Chao
 
6 Dmitry Jakovenko
 
½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
 
7 Anish Giri
 
½ - ½ Alexander Riazantsev
 
8 Ernesto Inarkiev
 
1 - 0 AR Saleh Salem
 
9 Hou Yifan Hou
 
0 - 1 Richard Rapport
 

El choque de azeríes Mamedyarov - Radjabov terminó rápidamente en tablas

Richard Rapport y su esposa disfrutando de unos momentos juntos antes de la partida

La victoria de Alexander Grischuk en la ronda 5 tuvo más que un interés deportivo. Transformó una Inglesa en una Dragón Acelerado invertida.0 Esta es la Dragón Acelerada normal:

 

Y esta es la Inglesa que se produjo en Eljanov-Grischuk:

 

Pavel Eljanov - Alexander Grischuk comentada por Krikor Mekhitarian

[Event "Geneva Grand Prix 2017"] [Site "Geneva SUI"] [Date "2017.07.10"] [Round "5.3"] [White "Eljanov, Pavel"] [Black "Grischuk, Alexander"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A29"] [WhiteElo "2739"] [BlackElo "2761"] [Annotator "Mekhitarian, Krikor"] [PlyCount "76"] [EventDate "2017.07.06"] [EventType "swiss"] 1. c4 (1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 g6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 {You will soon understand why I am showing this variation...} Nc6 5. Nc3 Bg7 6. Be3 Nf6 7. Bc4 O-O 8. Bb3 d6 9. h3 Na5 10. O-O b6 11. Re1 Bb7 12. Bg5) 1... Nf6 2. Nc3 e5 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. g3 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. Bg2 Bc5 $5 {It's amazing how Grischuk constantly comes up with new ideas. This move has been played many times already, but the strongest player who tried it was 2200, after which it mostly happened in beginner games. There were some recent correspondence games, which Grischuk probably used to find it. He is trying to play the usual Bc4 line that White plays against the Accelerated Dragon (with reversed colors)} 7. O-O (7. Nxe5 {would be something to consider, but it turns out to be harmless} Nxc3 8. bxc3 (8. Bxc6+ bxc6 {Black has decent compensation in both cases (dxc3 or bxc3)} 9. dxc3 (9. bxc3 Qd5 10. Nf3 Bh3 $44) 9... Qe7 $5 $44) (8. Nxc6 $4 Qf6 $1 {hitting the queen and mate in f2} 9. dxc3 Qxf2+ 10. Kd2 Qxg2 $19) 8... Nxe5 (8... Bxf2+ $2 {this kind of move is known to be a mistake, because the king is safely placed, while White in the meantime has a strong center and the bishop pair} 9. Kxf2 Nxe5 10. Rf1 $16 {followed by Kg1, and d4-e4}) 9. d4 Bd6 10. dxe5 Bxe5 $11 {and Black is very happy with the better structure. Soon c6 will be played, and the g2 bishop will be neutralized}) 7... O-O 8. d3 (8. Nxd5 {was played in correspondence chess, a couple of years ago} Qxd5 9. Ng5 Qc4 $5 {was the original move played} (9... Qd8 {is acceptable, but runs into} 10. Nxh7 $5 Re8 {threatening to move the c5-bishop} (10... Kxh7 $2 11. Qc2+ Kg8 12. Qxc5 $16) 11. Ng5 (11. h4 $5 f6 12. Qc2 $13 {followed by Qg6, the position remains very unclear (and weird!)}) 11... Qxg5 12. d4 (12. Bxc6 $5 bxc6 13. d4 Qh5 14. dxc5 Bg4 $44 {should be well compensated for Black}) 12... Qh5 13. dxc5 Rd8 14. Bd2 Nd4 $36) 10. b3 Qg4 11. Qc2 {White has to do this, otherwise Black is simply fine} Bxf2+ 12. Rxf2 Qxg5 13. Bxc6 bxc6 14. Qxc6 Bh3 15. d3 Qe7 16. Be3 Rfc8 17. Qe4 f6 $13 {again with original play, that should be balanced: 1/2-1/2 (30) Golubenko,A (2198)-Zakharov,Y (2229) ICCF 2015}) (8. Nxe5 {runs into the same theme} Nxc3 9. bxc3 (9. Nxc6 $2 Nxd1 10. Nxd8 Bxf2+ 11. Kh1 Bg4 $1 $17) 9... Nxe5 10. d4 Bd6 11. dxe5 Bxe5 $11 {and Black should be happy after c6}) 8... Bb6 9. Na4 {similar to the Accelerated Dragon, White gets the bishop pair (there are many lines where Black plays Na5). In the other hand, Black obtains very good central control} Re8 10. Bg5 (10. b3 {would be similar to how Black plays the Accelerated Dragon (Na5, followed by b6, Bb7). Good news for Black is that there was no need to lose a tempo with h6 (h3), since the bishop is still on c8 (please read the analysis before the 1st move!), and the bishop also went directly to g4, without 'stopping' at e6, as it happens in the dragon.} Bg4 11. Bb2 Qd7 {followed by Rad8, and Black is totally fine} (11... Nd4 $5 12. Nxb6 axb6 13. Nxd4 exd4 14. Re1 c5 15. Qd2 Qd7 $11 {and there is nothing to complain about in Black's position})) 10... Qd6 11. Nd2 Qg6 $1 { the queen finds and excellen square here} 12. Ne4 (12. Bxd5 $5 {was possibly better than the game} Qxg5 13. Rc1 Bh3 (13... Ne7 {more solid} 14. Bg2 c6 { threatening Bc7 at some point} 15. Nxb6 axb6 16. a4 {to stop b5} Nd5 17. Nc4 Qd8 $11 {with balanced play}) 14. Re1 Rad8 (14... Ba5 $5) 15. Bxc6 bxc6 { with interesting play}) 12... Bg4 $1 (12... f5 {there is no need to play this} 13. Nec5 Qxg5 14. Bxd5+ Kh8 15. Rc1 $13 {I like Grischuk's decision better, to bring Be6 and Rad8 quickly (he played Bg4 first to provoke h3)}) (12... Be6 $5 {also perfectly fine, but Bg4 should be an improved version, h3 may be a weakness in some variations}) 13. h3 Be6 14. Bd2 Rad8 $15 {now Black is already to be preferred - everything is harmonious, f5 is coming and he has Bc8 whenever a knight arrives on c5} 15. Kh2 Kh8 16. a3 f5 $1 17. Nec5 Bc8 { all of Grischuk's forces are heading towards the center - e4 is unstoppable, unless White himself plays it, which was a way that Eljanov could try and complicate matters.} 18. b4 (18. e4 Nf6 $1 (18... fxe4 {is the solid way to deal with this} 19. Bxe4 Qf7 $15 {and moves like Nd4 are coming, Black is doing fine}) 19. exf5 Bxf5 $1 (19... Qxf5 $5 $15) 20. Nxb7 (20. Nxb6 axb6 21. Nxb7 Rd5 $3 {defending the c6 knight very creatively} 22. Bxd5 Nxd5 {Black wants to pick up the knight with Bc8} 23. Qf3 {forced} Nd4 $3 24. Qxd5 Qh5 25. h4 Be6 $1 26. Qg2 Nf3+ 27. Kh1 Nxd2 28. Rfe1 Nf3 29. Re3 Bd5 $19) 20... Rxd3 21. Nxb6 Bxh3 $3 {an amazing move, instantly spotted by the computer. The idea is to distract the bishop and maintain a strong initiative, with two pawns for the piece. I think it is almost impossible for a human to find all these moves, specially considering White remains with the pure bishop pair} 22. Bxh3 axb6 $17 {threatening Nd4} 23. Rc1 Nd4 24. Rc3 Nf3+ 25. Qxf3 Rxf3 26. Rxf3 Qh5 27. Kg2 Qf7 $1 $19 {followed by Qd5}) 18... e4 $1 19. e3 $2 (19. dxe4 $1 fxe4 20. Qb1 (20. Qc2 {a very ugly move to make (allowing Nd4), but that is the computer's suggestion} Nd4 (20... Qh5 $5 21. Nxb6 Nd4 $36 {looks ugly for White }) 21. Qc4 e3 22. Bc1 $13 {and miraculously White is ok, according to the computer}) 20... Nd4 21. Bxe4 $2 (21. Nxe4 Bf5 $17) 21... Qh5 $19) 19... Bxc5 $1 {Eljanov's position simply collapses now, b6 and Ba6 are coming} (19... exd3 $2 20. Nxb6 axb6 21. Nxd3 $14 {and White is even slightly better}) 20. Nxc5 b6 21. Nb3 Ba6 $19 22. Nc1 Ne5 {now it's all over, Black starts picking up material and has a dominant position} 23. Qa4 Bxd3 24. Nxd3 Nxd3 25. b5 (25. Qxa7 $2 Ra8 26. Qb7 Qe6 27. b5 Ne5 $1 $19 {and White should resign}) 25... h5 26. Qc2 Qd6 (26... h4 $1 27. gxh4 Qf6 {with a devastating attack, but Grischuk wanted to keep it simple}) 27. h4 Qe5 28. Kg1 Re6 29. a4 Kh7 30. Ra3 Rdd6 31. a5 c5 {starting serious action on the queen-side, where Black keeps all the advantages as well} 32. bxc6 Rxc6 33. Qd1 Nf6 $1 {a good moment to remove the knight, not only to defend h5, but also because Bc3 is not possible anymore} 34. axb6 axb6 35. Qb1 Red6 {the problem is that White can never activate his bishops, not to mention the material disadvantage} 36. Rb3 Ng4 37. Bb4 Rd5 38. Be1 Rc1 {And White resigned. A very convincing game from Alexander Grischuk, who joins Radjabov in the lead with 3.5/5! On the 12th of July, they both have White - against Aronian and Harikrishna, respectively. A lot of action yet to come in the final four rounds, stay tuned!} 0-1

Levon Aronian y Peter Svidler disfrutando de la belleza de Ginebra

Partidas de las rondas 1 a 5

 

Clasificación tras la ronda 5

País Nombre 1 2 3   5 Puntos Des1 Des2
1
 
Teimour Radjabov 12s1 10w1 3s½ 5w½ 4s½ 3.5 / 5 14.00  
2
 
Alexander Grischuk 13s½ 17w1 8s½ 3w½ 10s1 3.5 / 5 12.00  
3
 
Levon Aronian 7w½ 11s1 1w½ 2s½ 6w½ 3.0 / 5 15.00  
4
 
Shakhriyar Mamedyarov 9s½ 13w1 5s½ 10w½ 1w½ 3.0 / 5 14.00  
5
 
Pentala Harikrishna 15s1 8w½ 4w½ 1s½ 14w½ 3.0 / 5 13.50  
6
 
Peter Svidler 11w½ 7s½ 9w½ 8w1 3s½ 3.0 / 5 13.00  
7
 
Li Chao 3s½ 6w½ 12s½ 11w½ 8s½ 2.5 / 5 13.50 66.00
8
 
Michael Adams 16w1 5s½ 2w½ 6s0 7w½ 2.5 / 5 13.50 63.00
9
 
Boris Gelfand 4w½ 14s½ 6s½ 12w½ 11s½ 2.5 / 5 13.50 62.00
10
 
Pavel Eljanov 18w1 1s0 14w1 4s½ 2w0 2.5 / 5 13.50 61.50
11
 
Dmitry Jakovenko 6s½ 3w0 17s1 7s½ 9w½ 2.5 / 5 12.50  
12
 
Anish Giri 1w0 16s1 7w½ 9s½ 15w½ 2.5 / 5 12.00  
13
 
Ernesto Inarkiev 2w½ 4s0 18w½ 15s½ 16w1 2.5 / 5 11.00  
14
 
Ian Nepomniachtchi 17s½ 9w½ 10s0 18w1 5s½ 2.5 / 5 10.50 62.50
15
 
Alexander Riazantsev 5w0 18s½ 16w½ 13w½ 12s½ 2.0 / 5    
16
 
AR Saleh Salem 8s0 12w0 15s½ 17w1 13s0 1.5 / 5 11.00 58.00
17
 
Richard Rapport 14w½ 2s0 11w0 16s0 18s1 1.5 / 5 11.00 57.00
18
 
Hou Yifan 10s0 15w½ 13s½ 14s0 17w0 1.0 / 5    

Las retransmisiones

(Mientras estén en marcha las partidas)

Enlace directo a la retransmisión

Se disputará entre el 5 y el 16 de julio. Del total de 24 jugadores seleccionados para disputar la serie del Grand Prix, en Ginebra competirán 18, tanto por los premios, como por los puntos del circuito, cuyos dos mejores clasificados se asegurarán plaza en el Torneo de Candidatos.

El lugar del encuentro será el hotel Richemond, en el centro de la ciudad de Ginebra (Suiza), a orillas del lago del mismo nombre.

Tras los dos primeros torneos del circuito, Shakhriyar Mamedyarov encabeza la general con 280 puntos. Ding Liren figura en la segunda posición con 240 puntos y Alexander Grischuk y Maxime Vachier-Lagrave los siguen con 211,4 puntos cada uno.

World Chess FIDE Grand Prix 2017

El World Chess FIDE Grand Prix 2017 es una serie de 4 torneos de ajedrez que forman parte del circuito del Campeonato del Mundo. Los dos mejores clasificados tendrán plaza en el Torneo de Candidatos 2018.

En cada torneo juegan 18 ajedrecistas. En total participarán 24 jugadores en el circuito y cada jugador participará en 3 torneos en total.

Los torneos se disputarán por sistema suizo a 9 rondas. Los jugadores recibirán 1 punto por victoria, medio punto por las tablas y cero puntos si caen derrotados.

Los puntos de Grand Prix determinarán la clasificación del circuito. Dos jugadores se han clasificado como finalistas del duelo por el Campeonato del Mundo 2016, 4 jugadores han llegado desde las semifinales en la Copa del Mundo 2015, 8 jugadores se han clasificado debido a sus valoraciones Elo, un jugador se ha clasificado a través de los torneos de la ACP y 9 ajedrecistas son designados directamente por Agon y FIDE (Deben tener una valoración Elo superior a 2700 puntos)

La bolsa de premios de cada torneo asciende a 130.000 euros, o sea que la serie de torneos del Grand Prixde totaliza 520.000 euros. 

Clasificación absoluta

# Nombre Elo Sharjah Moscú Ginebra Palma de Mallorca Total
1 Shakhriyar Mamedyarov  2800 140 140 0 0 280
2 Ding Liren  2783 70 170 0 0 240
3 Alexander Grischuk  2761 140 71.4 0 0 211.4
4 Maxime Vachier-Lagrave  2796 140 71.4 0 0 211.4
5 Hikaru Nakamura  2785 70 71.4 0 0 141.4
6 Hou Yifan 2666 7 71.4 0 0 78.4
7 Michael Adams 2736 70 3 0 0 73
8 Ian Nepomniachtchi 2732 70 3 0 0 73
9 Peter Svidler 2756 0 71.4 0 0 71.4
10 Teimour Radjabov  2724 0 71.4 0 0 71.4
11 Anish Giri  2771 0 71.4 0 0 71.4
12 Dmitry Jakovenko 2708 70 0 0 0 70
13 Francisco Vallejo Pons  2717 25 4 0 0 29
14 Richard Rapport 2694 25 0 0 0 25
15 Pavel Eljanov  2739 25 0 0 0 25
16 Li Chao  2720 25 0 0 0 25
17 Evgeny Tomashevsky  2706 3 20 0 0 23
18 Pentala Harikrishna  2737 0 20 0 0 20
19 Boris Gelfand 2728 0 20 0 0 20
20 Jon Ludvig Hammer 2628 3 7 0 0 10
21 Levon Aronian 2793 7 0 0 0 7
22 Salem Saleh    3 3 0 0 6
23 Alexander Riazantsev  2671 1 0 0 0 1
24 Ernesto Inarkiev  2707 0 1 0 0 1

Agon tiene la exclusiva de la retransmisión de las partidas de los torneos del Grand Prix de la FIDE y quiere que el sitio web oficial www.worldchess.com sea el único donde se puedan seguir en directo. Gracias a un acuerdo de colaboración entre Agon y ChessBase, nuestros clientes Premium podrán seguir las partidas en directo en Playchess.com.

Programa

Fecha Hora Actividad
05.07.2017   Inauguración
06.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 1
07.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 2
08.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 3
09.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 4
10.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 5
11.07.2017   Día de descanso
12.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 6
13.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 7
14.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 8
15.07.2017 ?? CEST Ronda 9
    Clausura

Premios y puntuación

Puesto Premio Puntos Grand Prix
1 €20,000 170
2 €15,000 140
3 €12,000 110
4 €11,000 90
5 €10,000 80
6 €9,000 70
7 €8,000 60
8 €7,000 50
9 €6,000 40
10 €5,000 30
11 €4,250 20
12 €4,000 10
13 €3,750 8
14 €3,500 6
15 €3,250 4
16 €3,000 3
17 €2,750 2
18 €2,500 1

En caso de empate, los puntos se repartirían a partes iguales. No hay valoraciones de desempate.

En la clasificación absoluta, los puestos se determinan de la siguiente manera (en caso de empate a puntos):

  1. Puntos por duelos (en los tres torneos jugados)
  2. Cantidad de partidas con negras
  3. Cantidad de partidas ganadas
  4. Cantidad de victorias con negras
  5. Por sorteo

Todas las retransmisiones en Playchess.com a golpe de vista (Guía)

ChessBase Account Premium 1 año

Con la cuenta ChessBase siempre tiene acceso a la videoteca, el entrenador táctico, el entrenador de aperturas, la base de datos online, Let’s Check, Playchess.com... ¡Todo lo que necesita es una conexión a Internet y un navegador actualizado, da igual que tenga iPad, tableta, PC, iMac, Windows, Android o Linux!

Más información...

Fotos: Maria Yassakova (World Chess)

Enlaces


Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Comentar

Normas sobre los comentarios

 
 

¿Aún no eres usuario? Registro