Ginebra chispeante

13/07/2017 – El día de descanso parece que tuvo un efecto balsámico, porque la ronda 6 fue chispeante. Cinco de las nueve partidas terminaron decantadas e incluso las tablas entre los líderes Alexander Grischuk y Teimour Radjabov fueron duramente peleadas. Lo más destacado del día es la convincente victoria de Harikrishna sobre Aronian, lo que le permite acercarse a los líderes.

Noticias de ajedrez


ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14  Download

Programa de gestión de bases de datos de ajedrez que es referencia mundial. Todos usan ChessBase, desde el campeón del mundo al aficionado. Inicie su historia de éxito personal con ChessBase.

Más información...

Ronda 6

Resultados

Nombre Pts. Resultado Pts. Nombre
Grischuk Alexander ½ - ½ Radjabov Teimour
Aronian Levon 3 0 - 1 3 Harikrishna Pentala
Svidler Peter 3 ½ - ½ 3 Mamedyarov Shakhriyar
Jakovenko Dmitry ½ - ½ Giri Anish
Nepomniachtchi Ian 1 - 0 Inarkiev Ernesto
Li Chao B 1 - 0 Eljanov Pavel
Gelfand Boris ½ - ½ Adams Michael
Rapport Richard 0 - 1 2 Riazantsev Alexander
Salem A.R. Saleh 0 - 1 1 Hou Yifan

Vídeo sobre el día de descanso por la WGM Anna Burtasova

Fue un duelo fascinante el que mantuvieron los líderes, ya que Alexander Grischuk mostró que había ido a ganar. La novedad que planteó le dio una cierta iniciativa, pero la posición de las negras seguía siendo sólida y un error en la jugada 31 permitió a Radjabov igualar. Se dieron la mano en la jugada 41.

Una de las mayores sorpresas del día fue la derrota de Levon Aronian ante Pentala Harikirshna. El armenio es especialmente peligroso cuando conduce las blancas. Había preparado una inusual novedad en la apertura con 13.Te1 que necesitaría algunas jugadas para hacer visibles sus intenciones y tras  16.d4! llevaba el timón. Sin embargo, con 20.f4? y 21.b5? debilitó fatalmente sin motivo la posición del rey y fue castigado rápidamente.

 
 

El indio no dejó escapar la oportunidad y comparte el liderato con Grischuk y Radjabov, todos con 4/6

Levon Aronian patinó y fue debidamente castigado por Pentala Harikrishna

[Event "FIDE Geneva Grand Prix 2017"] [Site "Geneva"] [Date "2017.07.12"] [Round "6"] [White "Aronian, Levon"] [Black "Harikrishna, Pentala"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A29"] [WhiteElo "2809"] [BlackElo "2737"] [Annotator "A. Silver"] [PlyCount "76"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] 1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. g3 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. Bg2 Nb6 7. O-O Be7 8. d3 O-O 9. Be3 Be6 10. Rc1 f5 11. a3 Kh8 12. b4 {4} a6 13. Re1 Qe8 $146 14. Qd2 Bd6 15. Bxb6 cxb6 16. d4 $1 exd4 17. Nxd4 Rd8 18. Nxe6 Qxe6 19. Qa2 Qh6 20. f4 {It is very difficult to understand why White chose to weaken his king like this. Presumably his idea was to fix the f5 pawn and then push e4 with the support of his pieces, but his king remains wide open, and for no clear benefit.} (20. e3 {was a much saner choice.}) 20... a5 $11 21. b5 Bc5+ $1 22. e3 $2 {[#] A blunder that meets with a nasty tactic.} (22. Kh1 $1 $11 {was the only way to keep the balance.} Bf2 23. bxc6 Bxg3 24. h3 Bxe1 25. c7) 22... Ne5 $1 $17 {Strongly threatening ...Nd3.} 23. Rcd1 $2 {Unfortunately, the exchange could not really be saved without greater consequences.} (23. fxe5 Bxe3+) 23... Ng4 $1 $19 {White is lost.} 24. h3 Nxe3 25. Rxd8 Rxd8 26. Kh2 g5 27. fxg5 Qxg5 28. Qe6 f4 29. Ne4 {[#]} Qg7 $1 (29... fxg3+ 30. Kh1 $17) 30. g4 Nc2 31. Rf1 Nd4 ({Not} 31... Nxa3 $2 32. Nxc5 bxc5 33. Rxf4 $18 {and suddenly White is the one winning.}) 32. Qf6 Qxf6 33. Nxf6 Bxa3 34. Bxb7 Bd6 35. h4 a4 36. g5 a3 37. Kh3 Be5 38. Kg4 Nc2 0-1

Entrevista a Pentala Harikrishna

Peter Svidler jugó con fuego intentando construir un ataque con sacrificio contra Shakhriyar Mamedyarov. El azerí mantuvo el control y pudo aspirar a ganar y unirse a los líderes. No obstante, las blancas hicieron un buen trabajo de zapa y fueron reduciendo la ventaja de las negras hasta salvar medio punto.

Ian Nepomniachtchi fue un convincente ganador en la ronda 6 ya que despachó a Ernesto Inarkiev en una hermosa partida. Con la victoria suma 3.5/6, a medio punto de los líderes.

Ian Nepomniachtchi - Ernesto Inarkiev comentada por Krikor Mekhitarian

[Event "Geneva Grand Prix 2017"] [Site "Geneva SUI"] [Date "2017.07.12"] [Round "6"] [White "Nepomniachtchi, Ian"] [Black "Inarkiev, Ernesto"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C87"] [WhiteElo "2742"] [BlackElo "2707"] [Annotator "Mekhitarian, Krikor"] [PlyCount "67"] [EventDate "2017.07.06"] [EventType "swiss"] [SourceDate "2007.01.15"] [SourceVersionDate "2007.01.15"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. d3 $5 {I have played many games in this system, and I think it's a great way to play more flexibly against the Ruy Lopez, without entering forced lines with the standard 6.Re1} d6 (6... b5 {is the most common reply} 7. Bb3 d6 8. a4 {is the move I always liked, trying to play c3-Bc2 quickly, without allowing Na5-c5 (which Black still may play, but he needs to take some care)} (8. a3 {but this is the current fashion, with numerous games, and a very important recent one} O-O 9. Nc3 {here Black has played seven different moves in high-level games! just to show how rich the position is} Nb8 10. Ne2 Nbd7 11. c3 Bb7 12. Ng3 c5 13. Re1 Rc8 14. Nf5 c4 15. dxc4 Bxe4 16. Nxe7+ Qxe7 17. cxb5 axb5 18. Bg5 Nc5 19. Ba2 h6 20. Bh4 g5 21. Bg3 Bh7 22. Qe2 Kg7 23. Rad1 Nfe4 24. Rd5 f5 25. Rxe5 $1 { a very creative approach by the ex-world champion. He ended up winning the game in the 42th move} dxe5 26. Bxe5+ Nf6 27. Qxb5 $40 {1-0 (42) Kramnik,V (2811)-Harikrishna,P (2755) Shamkir 2017}) 8... Bd7 9. c3 Na5 (9... O-O 10. Bc2 $1 {stopping Na5-c5, is the main idea. We will get a position very similar to this current game} Re8 11. Nbd2 Bf8 12. Re1 b4 13. a5 g6 14. Bb3 Be6 15. Ba4 Bd7 16. Nf1 $13 {with interesting play: 1/2-1/2 (116) Caruana,F (2794)-Svidler, P (2757) Moscow 2016}) 10. Bc2 c5 11. d4 Qb8 $1 {an important move to defend the a8-rook - this was played in the 4th round} (11... Qc7 $6 12. axb5 { and Black is forced to take with the bishop to avoid b4} Bxb5 13. Re1 $16) 12. Bg5 h6 13. Bh4 (13. Bxf6 {this move was tried three times} Bxf6 14. axb5 $6 (14. dxe5 dxe5 15. Qd5 Qc8 $5 (15... Nb7 $5 16. axb5 Be6 17. Qc6+ Bd7 18. Qd5 Be6 19. Qd1 axb5 20. Rxa8 Qxa8 21. Na3 Qa5 (21... b4 $5) 22. Nxb5 $1 Bc4 23. Nd6+ Nxd6 24. Qxd6 Bxf1 25. Kxf1 Qb5+ 26. Ke1 $44 {with good compensation, Navara went on to win the game: 1-0 (61) Navara,D (2703)-Caruana,F (2779) Rhodes 2013} ) 16. Nxe5 Be6 17. Qd6 Be7 $6 (17... b4 $1 $44) 18. Qd1 Qc7 19. axb5 axb5 20. Nf3 O-O 21. Nbd2 $16 {and White slowly consolidated, 1-0 (59) Khairullin,I (2629)-Gustafsson,J (2629) Bangkok 2016}) 14... axb5 15. dxc5 dxc5 16. Qd5 { now it simply fails for White, and Black achieves an advantage} Qc8 17. b4 (17. Nxe5 $2 {now this loses} Be6 18. Qd6 Ra6 $1 $19 {winning the knight, this is the difference}) 17... Be6 18. Qxc5 Qxc5 19. bxc5 Kd7 $1 20. Na3 Kc6 21. Rab1 Rhb8 $17 {with a big advantage in the endgame: 0-1 (63) Morozevich,A (2683) -Vitiugov,N (2718) Novi Sad 2016}) 13... Be6 14. Nbd2 O-O 15. Re1 (15. h3 { also didn't create problems for Black} Rc8 16. Bg3 cxd4 17. cxd4 Nh5 $1 18. Bh2 Nf4 19. axb5 axb5 20. Bxf4 exf4 21. Bd3 Nc4 22. Qe2 Rxa1 23. Rxa1 Bf6 $132 { Caruana found enough counterplay: 1/2-1/2 (39) Ponomariov,R (2742)-Caruana,F (2774) Thessaloniki 2013}) 15... cxd4 16. cxd4 Rc8 17. h3 Nc6 $1 {after major simplifications, equality prevailed} 18. axb5 axb5 19. Rxa8 Qxa8 20. Bxf6 Bxf6 21. d5 Nb4 22. dxe6 Nxc2 23. exf7+ Kxf7 $11 {1/2-1/2 (30) Grischuk,A (2761) -Aronian,L (2809) Geneva SUI 2017}) 7. c3 {bringing the bishop directly to c2 whenever it's needed} O-O 8. h3 Re8 9. Re1 Bf8 10. Nbd2 (10. c4 $5 {an original try from the 2016 world title challenger, which has been repeated five times already in practice. The idea is to have harmonious development (Nc3 especially), at the same time avoiding b5. Naturally, the d4-square gets weakened, but h3 is very important to avoid Bg4} Nd7 11. Be3 Ne7 12. Nc3 c6 13. b4 $1 Ng6 14. Bb3 h6 15. a3 (15. d4 $1 $14 {was a very natural way to claim an advantage}) 15... Nf6 16. Ra2 (16. c5 $5 $14) 16... a5 17. Qb1 Nh5 18. Ne2 Qf6 $36 {followed by Nhf4. With a couple of imprecise moves, Karjakin handed over the initiative to Black, but ended up winning the game: 1-0 (51) Karjakin,S (2769)-Amin,B (2661) Baku 2016}) 10... b5 11. Bc2 h6 (11... Bb7 {is a good move that was played against me, and I reacted so poorly that in a few moves I had a locked bishop in b1!} 12. a4 $5 (12. d4 $1 {transposes to a Zaitsev line, with the correct tempos, because even though White played d3 and d4, he also brought the bishop to c2 (without Bb3)}) 12... h6 13. Nf1 (13. b4 $1 $14 { with the idea of Nb3}) 13... d5 $1 {Black is doing fine already} 14. Qe2 (14. exd5 Nxd5 15. axb5 axb5 16. Rxa8 Qxa8 17. d4 $11 {should lead to massive simplifications}) 14... b4 15. Ng3 (15. a5 $1 $13 {an important move, to avoid my opponent's plan}) 15... Na5 $1 {suddenly I have problems to avoid b3, and cxb4 (although probably necessary), looks ugly as well} 16. Nf5 $2 (16. cxb4 Bxb4 17. Bd2 Bxd2 18. Qxd2 dxe4 19. dxe4 Qxd2 20. Nxd2 Rad8 $36 {and Black has a slight initiative}) 16... b3 17. Bb1 Bc8 18. N3h4 d4 19. cxd4 exd4 $17 { and it's clear I lost the game without a chance :): 0-1 (42) Mekhitarian,K (2544)-Vajda,L (2617) Albena 2013}) 12. a4 b4 13. a5 $1 {a good move to win space on the queen-side - not only the weakness on a6 is now fixed, but most importantly, there is no Na5 anymore (after Rb8 let's say).} Rb8 14. Nc4 g6 $6 {it feels like Black has to play in the center before White confortably plays d4} (14... Bd7 {was the precedent} 15. Bd2 bxc3 16. bxc3 Qc8 17. Nh2 (17. d4 $5 $14 {was more logical and direct, White keeps a small edge always}) 17... Be6 18. Ba4 Qb7 19. Ng4 Nxg4 20. hxg4 Red8 $1 (20... Bxc4 $2 {this is not something White should be worried about, because the light squares become a big problem, and d5 will never be played} 21. dxc4 Re6 22. g5 $5 $16) 21. Bc2 d5 22. exd5 Bxd5 23. Ne3 (23. g5 $5 $40) 23... Bb3 (23... Be6 $11) 24. Rb1 Bxc2 25. Qxc2 Qa8 $11 {1-0 (41) Naiditsch,A (2689)-Lenic,L (2625) Reykjavik 2015}) ( 14... bxc3 15. bxc3 d5 {is a typical reaction in these positions, but White always has something to play for} 16. exd5 Nxd5 (16... Qxd5 $5) 17. Bd2 f6 18. d4 $5 exd4 19. Rxe8 Qxe8 20. Nxd4 Nxd4 21. cxd4 $40 {and White has perspectives to attack the king-side, with a move like Qf3}) (14... d5 $5 { is also possible}) 15. Bd2 bxc3 16. bxc3 Bg7 17. d4 $1 $14 exd4 18. cxd4 Nb4 $6 (18... d5 $1 {was good, trying to exchange a pair of rooks or a pair of knights } 19. Nce5 $1 (19. exd5 $6 Rxe1+ 20. Qxe1 Qxd5 $11 {and Black is doing ok}) 19... Nxe5 20. Nxe5 Bb7 21. Ba4 Re6 {looks weird, but whenever White plays exd5, Black is fine} 22. Rb1 $1 Ba8 $1 $13 {with an unclear position} (22... Nxe4 $2 23. Nd7 $1 Bxd4 24. Be3 $16)) 19. Bb1 d5 20. Nce5 $1 {threatening Bxb4 followed by Nc6} Re6 (20... dxe4 21. Bxb4 Rxb4 (21... exf3 22. Nc6 $18) 22. Ba2 $1 {nice move} (22. Nc6 $2 Qd6 $1 23. Nxb4 exf3 24. Rxe8+ Nxe8 {and Black has amazing compensation} 25. Qe1 {forced, to defend b4 and win a tempo on e8} Nf6 $17) 22... exf3 23. Bxf7+ $40 {with a very strong attack}) 21. exd5 Nfxd5 22. Qc1 $1 $16 Qf8 23. Be4 {White has a very strong initiative, safer and better placed pieces} Rb5 (23... f5 $5 {an ugly positional move, but perhaps White's initiative had to be parried somehow} 24. Bxd5 Nxd5 25. Qc4 Rb5 {trying to stabilize with Qe8} 26. Rab1 Qe8 27. Rxb5 Qxb5 28. Qa2 {threatening Rb1 with deadly effects} Qb7 29. Rc1 $16 {Black still has problems to coordinate}) 24. Rb1 c6 (24... f5 {allows a different idea now} 25. Bxb4 $1 Nxb4 26. Bc2 $1 Nxc2 27. Qxc2 Rxb1 28. Rxb1 {And Black remains in deep trouble:} Qd6 29. Qb3 $1 Kh7 30. Rc1 Bd7 31. Qb7 $18) 25. Qc4 Qd6 26. Rb3 $1 {the rook will swing over to the king-side in many lines} Bf8 27. h4 $5 {bringing another soldier to the battle, more logical than the unclear 27.Nxf7!?} (27. Nxf7 $5 {shows White's potential on the king-side} Kxf7 28. Ne5+ Kg8 (28... Rxe5 {doesn't help} 29. dxe5 Qe6 30. Rf3+ Kg7 (30... Ke8 31. Bb1 $1 $18 {followed by the devastating Rf6!}) 31. Bxg6 $1 $18 {f8 falls or White wins the queen with Rg3}) 29. Bxg6 Rf6 (29... Rxg6 30. Nxg6 Qxg6 31. Rg3 Qxg3 32. fxg3 $18 {should be equally hopeless, with such an open king}) 30. Rg3 Bg7 31. Be4 {threatening Bxb4 Rxb4 Bxd5+! winning a piece} Be6 32. Qc1 $40 {the attack continues, and should be more than enough having already two pawns for the pieec}) 27... c5 $2 {Black's position was already vulnerable with the pawn on c6, now it totally collapses - cxd4 is not even a threat, because the c8 bishop is hanging} (27... Nf6 { The position is difficult anyway, but this was the last chance for Black to try some regrouping, it turns out that the knight on d5 is not ideally placed} 28. Bb1 Qd5 29. Qc3 $1 {threatening Bxh6 and Rxb4} Re8 (29... h5 $2 30. Ng5 Re7 31. Ne4 $16) 30. Bxh6 Be6 31. Rb2 Bxh6 32. Rxb4 $16) 28. h5 $1 $18 g5 29. Bf5 ( 29. Bxg5 hxg5 30. Nxg5 $18 {was also devastating, followed by Rg3 and taking on f7}) 29... Ne7 30. dxc5 $1 Rxc5 31. Bxb4 $18 Nxf5 32. Bxc5 Qxc5 33. Qxc5 Bxc5 34. Rc3 {a fine game by Nepo, now at 3,5/6, trailing by half a point the current three leaders: Radjabov, Grischuk and Harikrishna!} 1-0

Entrevista a Ian Nepomniachtchi

Pavel Eljanov está jugando un torneo a todo o nada, con solo unas tablas en 6 partidas y le volvió a tocar la cruz. Li Chao supo como castigar la renuencia de las negras a enrocarse y consiguió su primera victoria, tras 5 tablas.

Li Chao rompió su racha de empates a costa de un Pavel Eljanov que descuidó su rey en el centro

 

[Event "FIDE Geneva Grand Prix 2017"] [Site "Geneva"] [Date "2017.07.12"] [Round "6"] [White "Li, Chao b"] [Black "Eljanov, Pavel"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E12"] [WhiteElo "2735"] [BlackElo "2739"] [Annotator "A. Silver"] [PlyCount "69"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 4. a3 Bb7 5. Nc3 d5 6. Qc2 dxc4 7. e4 c5 8. Bf4 $146 (8. d5 exd5 9. exd5 a6 10. Bxc4 Bd6 11. O-O O-O 12. Bg5 Nbd7 13. a4 Qc7 14. h3 h6 15. Bxf6 Nxf6 {1/2-1/2 (35) Sokolov,I (2650)-David,A (2579) Saint-Quentin 2014}) 8... a6 9. Bxc4 b5 10. Bb3 cxd4 11. Rd1 Qb6 12. Nxd4 Bc5 13. Nf3 Nbd7 14. O-O Rc8 15. Qe2 Qc6 $2 {[#] Black is just begging for trouble, leaving his king in the center like that, and White is all too happy to oblige. } (15... Be7 $14) 16. Bd5 $1 $18 Qb6 17. Bxb7 Qxb7 {[#]} 18. e5 $1 Ng4 19. Ne4 Be7 (19... O-O {wouldn't change much.} 20. h3 f5 (20... Nh6 21. Bxh6 gxh6 22. Rxd7 {and if} Qxd7 23. Nf6+) 21. Nd6 Bxd6 22. Rxd6 $18) 20. Nd6+ Bxd6 21. Rxd6 Nc5 22. Nd2 h5 23. b4 Na4 24. Ne4 O-O 25. h3 Rc4 26. Re1 f5 27. exf6 $1 ({Not} 27. hxg4 $2 Rxe4 28. Qd2 Rxe1+ 29. Qxe1 fxg4 $11) 27... Nxf6 28. Nxf6+ Rxf6 29. Rd8+ Rf8 (29... Kh7 30. Qxh5+ Rh6 31. Bxh6 gxh6 32. Rxe6) 30. Qxe6+ Qf7 31. Rxf8+ Kxf8 32. Qd6+ Kg8 33. g3 Nc3 34. Re7 Qf5 35. Be5 1-0

Li Chao superó a Pavel Eljanov y se acerca a la parte alta de la tabla (Fotografía: Max Avdeev)

Hou Yifan y su legió de seguidores estuvieron encantados al ver como la jugadora china lograba su primer entero. En una dura batalla con negras contra Saleh Salem, presionó y durante mucho tiempo fue incapaz de doblegar a su rival. Cuando parecía que tenía todo controlado, en los apuros de tiempo Salem tuvo un desliz y permitió que Hou le diera mate.

Tras unas campañas con pocos éxitos, por fin Hou Yifan logra su primera victoria

Partidas de la ronda 6

 

Clasificación tras la ronda 6

Nombre Puntos
1 Grischuk Alexander 4,0
  Harikrishna Pentala 4,0
  Radjabov Teimour 4,0
4 Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 3,5
  Svidler Peter 3,5
  Nepomniachtchi Ian 3,5
  Li Chao B 3,5
8 Aronian Levon 3,0
  Giri Anish 3,0
  Adams Michael 3,0
  Gelfand Boris 3,0
  Jakovenko Dmitry 3,0
  Riazantsev Alexander 3,0
14 Eljanov Pavel 2,5
  Inarkiev Ernesto 2,5
16 Hou Yifan 2,0
17 Rapport Richard 1,5
  Salem A.R. Saleh 1,5

Las retransmisiones

(Mientras estén en marcha las partidas)

Enlace directo a la retransmisión

Se disputará entre el 5 y el 16 de julio. Del total de 24 jugadores seleccionados para disputar la serie del Grand Prix, en Ginebra competirán 18, tanto por los premios, como por los puntos del circuito, cuyos dos mejores clasificados se asegurarán plaza en el Torneo de Candidatos.

El lugar del encuentro será el hotel Richemond, en el centro de la ciudad de Ginebra (Suiza), a orillas del lago del mismo nombre.

Tras los dos primeros torneos del circuito, Shakhriyar Mamedyarov encabeza la general con 280 puntos. Ding Liren figura en la segunda posición con 240 puntos y Alexander Grischuk y Maxime Vachier-Lagrave los siguen con 211,4 puntos cada uno.

World Chess FIDE Grand Prix 2017

El World Chess FIDE Grand Prix 2017 es una serie de 4 torneos de ajedrez que forman parte del circuito del Campeonato del Mundo. Los dos mejores clasificados tendrán plaza en el Torneo de Candidatos 2018.

En cada torneo juegan 18 ajedrecistas. En total participarán 24 jugadores en el circuito y cada jugador participará en 3 torneos en total.

Los torneos se disputarán por sistema suizo a 9 rondas. Los jugadores recibirán 1 punto por victoria, medio punto por las tablas y cero puntos si caen derrotados.

Los puntos de Grand Prix determinarán la clasificación del circuito. Dos jugadores se han clasificado como finalistas del duelo por el Campeonato del Mundo 2016, 4 jugadores han llegado desde las semifinales en la Copa del Mundo 2015, 8 jugadores se han clasificado debido a sus valoraciones Elo, un jugador se ha clasificado a través de los torneos de la ACP y 9 ajedrecistas son designados directamente por Agon y FIDE (Deben tener una valoración Elo superior a 2700 puntos)

La bolsa de premios de cada torneo asciende a 130.000 euros, o sea que la serie de torneos del Grand Prixde totaliza 520.000 euros. 

Clasificación absoluta

# Nombre Elo Sharjah Moscú Ginebra Palma de Mallorca Total
1 Shakhriyar Mamedyarov  2800 140 140 0 0 280
2 Ding Liren  2783 70 170 0 0 240
3 Alexander Grischuk  2761 140 71.4 0 0 211.4
4 Maxime Vachier-Lagrave  2796 140 71.4 0 0 211.4
5 Hikaru Nakamura  2785 70 71.4 0 0 141.4
6 Hou Yifan 2666 7 71.4 0 0 78.4
7 Michael Adams 2736 70 3 0 0 73
8 Ian Nepomniachtchi 2732 70 3 0 0 73
9 Peter Svidler 2756 0 71.4 0 0 71.4
10 Teimour Radjabov  2724 0 71.4 0 0 71.4
11 Anish Giri  2771 0 71.4 0 0 71.4
12 Dmitry Jakovenko 2708 70 0 0 0 70
13 Francisco Vallejo Pons  2717 25 4 0 0 29
14 Richard Rapport 2694 25 0 0 0 25
15 Pavel Eljanov  2739 25 0 0 0 25
16 Li Chao  2720 25 0 0 0 25
17 Evgeny Tomashevsky  2706 3 20 0 0 23
18 Pentala Harikrishna  2737 0 20 0 0 20
19 Boris Gelfand 2728 0 20 0 0 20
20 Jon Ludvig Hammer 2628 3 7 0 0 10
21 Levon Aronian 2793 7 0 0 0 7
22 Salem Saleh    3 3 0 0 6
23 Alexander Riazantsev  2671 1 0 0 0 1
24 Ernesto Inarkiev  2707 0 1 0 0 1

Agon tiene la exclusiva de la retransmisión de las partidas de los torneos del Grand Prix de la FIDE y quiere que el sitio web oficial www.worldchess.com sea el único donde se puedan seguir en directo. Gracias a un acuerdo de colaboración entre Agon y ChessBase, nuestros clientes Premium podrán seguir las partidas en directo en Playchess.com.

Programa

Fecha Hora Actividad
05.07.2017   Inauguración
06.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 1
07.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 2
08.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 3
09.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 4
10.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 5
11.07.2017   Día de descanso
12.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 6
13.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 7
14.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 8
15.07.2017 ?? CEST Ronda 9
    Clausura

Premios y puntuación

Puesto Premio Puntos Grand Prix
1 €20,000 170
2 €15,000 140
3 €12,000 110
4 €11,000 90
5 €10,000 80
6 €9,000 70
7 €8,000 60
8 €7,000 50
9 €6,000 40
10 €5,000 30
11 €4,250 20
12 €4,000 10
13 €3,750 8
14 €3,500 6
15 €3,250 4
16 €3,000 3
17 €2,750 2
18 €2,500 1

En caso de empate, los puntos se repartirían a partes iguales. No hay valoraciones de desempate.

En la clasificación absoluta, los puestos se determinan de la siguiente manera (en caso de empate a puntos):

  1. Puntos por duelos (en los tres torneos jugados)
  2. Cantidad de partidas con negras
  3. Cantidad de partidas ganadas
  4. Cantidad de victorias con negras
  5. Por sorteo

Todas las retransmisiones en Playchess.com a golpe de vista (Guía)

ChessBase Account Premium 1 año

Con la cuenta ChessBase siempre tiene acceso a la videoteca, el entrenador táctico, el entrenador de aperturas, la base de datos online, Let’s Check, Playchess.com... ¡Todo lo que necesita es una conexión a Internet y un navegador actualizado, da igual que tenga iPad, tableta, PC, iMac, Windows, Android o Linux!

Más información...

Fotos: Maria Yassakova (World Chess)

Enlaces


Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Comentar

Normas sobre los comentarios

 
 

¿Aún no eres usuario? Registro