Ginebra: Radjabov lo consiguió

16/07/2017 – Tras entablar con Ian Nepomniachtchi (Aleksandr Lenderman comenta la partida), Teimur Rajabov ganó el torneo de Ginebra del circuito de las series mundiales del Grand Prix de la FIDE. El azerí no había cosechado grandes triunfos últimamente, pero en Ginebra ha mostrado una magnífica forma y sacó medio punto de ventaja al propio Nepomniachtchi y a Alexander Grischuk. Solo dos partidas terminaron decantadas en la jornada de clausura: Peter Svidler ganó a Hou Yifan y Levon Aronian a Saleh Salem. La proxima y última cita será el Palma de Mallorca, del 16 al 25 de noviembre de 2017. ¡Resultará decisivo para saber quienes obtienen las plazas para el Torneo de Candidatos!

ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14  Download

Programa de gestión de bases de datos de ajedrez que es referencia mundial. Todos usan ChessBase, desde el campeón del mundo al aficionado. Inicie su historia de éxito personal con ChessBase.

Más información...

Ronda 9 y última

Resultados

Tab. Nombre País Elo Resultado Nombre País Elo
1 Ian Nepomniachtchi
 
2742 ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov
 
2724
2 Anish Giri
 
2775 ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk
 
2761
3 Shakhriyar Mamedyarov
 
2800 ½ - ½ Chao B Li
 
2735
4 Alexander Riazantsev
 
2654 ½ - ½ Michael Adams
 
2736
5 Penteala Harikrishna
 
2737 ½ - ½ Dmitrij Jakovenko
 
2703
6 Ernesto Inarkiev
 
2707 ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
 
2728
7 Peter Svidler
 
2749 1 - 0 Yifan Hou
 
2666
8 Pavel Eljanov
 
2739 ½ - ½ Richard Rapport
 
2694
9 Levon Aronian
 
2809 1 - 0 AR Saleh Salem
 
2638

Había prometido ser una partida interesante, pero resultaba imposible predecir hasta que punto. La unica forma de que Ian Nepomniachtchi coronase su ascensión en la segunda mitad de la prueba de Ginebra era derrotar a Teimour Radjabov, líder en solitario.

Teimour Radjabov llevó la iniciativa y terminó con éxito su campaña

Fue una partida muy dura, en la que ambos ofrecieron tablas en distintos momentos, que fueron declinadas por el rival. Tras las quejas de los espectadores y medios por la falta de combatividad en anteriores torneos del Grand Prix, los primeros tableros de la última jornada de Ginebra, no adolecieron en absoluto de ese defecto.

Una larga y luchada partida para decidir el título y acreditar a los contendientes

Ian Nepomniachtchi - Teimour Radjabov comentada por Aleksandr Lenderman

[Event "Geneva Grand Prix"] [Site "?"] [Date "2017.07.15"] [Round "9"] [White "Nepomniachtchi, Ian"] [Black "Radjabov, Teimour"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C54"] [Annotator "Aleksandr Lenderman"] [PlyCount "111"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] {Welcome everyone! This is GM Aleksandr Lenderman presenting to you the Game of the Day of round nine in the Geneva Grand prix. There were some other interesting games this round, besides this draw between the leaders, but in the end I decided that since this was a critical game for the final tournament standings, and it was an interesting battle, it deserved to be the choice.} 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 (3... Bc5 {is also very common leading to the traditional Italian Game.}) 4. d3 (4. Ng5 {is also interesting, leading to a very sharp game after d5.} d5 5. exd5 Na5 (5... Nxd5 $6 6. Nxf7 Kxf7 7. Qf3+ Ke6 8. Nc3 $40 {is a very dangerous attack for White, called the Fried Liver Attack.}) 6. Bb5+ c6 7. dxc6 bxc6 8. Bd3 {This move has been sort of the new main line these days, which leads to very sharp play.} (8. Be2 h6 $44 {Was the old main line.})) 4... Bc5 {And now we transpose into the main line.} (4... Be7 {is an additional line, which has the benefit of being flexible with Nf6 instead of Bc5.}) (4... h6 $5 {Even this is interesting, which allows the opportunity to play with d6 and g6 and Bg7, while stopping Ng5.}) (4... d6 $2 {Of course is a mistake here, since now White will play...} 5. Ng5 $1 d5 6. exd5 Nxd5 (6... Na5 7. Bb5+ c6 8. dxc6 bxc6 9. Ba4 $16 {Here Black barely has any compensation for the pawn.}) 7. Nxf7 {And be up a tempo.}) 5. O-O d6 6. c3 a6 7. a4 O-O 8. h3 h6 {Black deviates from another game Nepomniachtchi played before. However, this position after h6 did occur in the game Nepo-Mamedyarov, so it's likely that the top Azerbaijan players had studied this position together.} (8... Be6 9. Bxe6 fxe6 10. d4 Ba7 11. Re1 exd4 12. cxd4 e5 13. Be3 d5 14. Nc3 exd4 15. Nxd4 Bxd4 16. Bxd4 Nxe4 17. Nxe4 Nxd4 18. Qxd4 dxe4 19. Qxe4 {1/2 (40) Nepomniachtchi,I (2719)-Yu Yangyi (2737) Moscow RUS 2016 Where White had a very small pull but Black held in...}) 9. Re1 Ba7 {Deviating from Mamedyarov. This is still a very theoretical position though.} (9... Re8 10. Nbd2 Be6 11. Bxe6 Rxe6 12. b4 Ba7 13. Qc2 d5 14. Nb3 $14 {1-0 (54) Nepomniachtchi,I (2740)-Mamedyarov,S (2761) Moscow RUS 2016 is already a bit unpleasant for Black and White later on won a very nice game.}) 10. Nbd2 Ne7 11. d4 (11. Nf1 $5 {Has been tried a few times by Anish Giri.}) 11... Ng6 12. Bf1 Re8 13. Qc2 (13. a5 $5 {has been tried by Kramnik against Radjabov in the Olympiad, with a lot of success, but I'm sure Radjabov did a lot of work on this position. In general, when top players lose in a certain line they usually know it really deeply next time, so very often the next opponents don't go into that line, assuming they will be better prepared.} Bd7 14. b4 Bc6 (14... d5 {Possibly this was Radjabov's improvement.}) 15. d5 Bd7 16. c4 Nf4 17. c5 g5 $6 (17... dxc5) 18. Nc4 $16 {1-0 (34) Kramnik, V (2808)-Radjabov,T (2722) Baku AZE 2016 From here White won a very nice game.} ) 13... Nh7 14. dxe5 {This is a novelty according to my database.} (14. Nb3 Nh4 15. Nxh4 Qxh4 16. dxe5 dxe5 17. Be3 Ng5 18. Bxa7 Rxa7 {0-1 (69) Dragnev,V (2515)-Zilka,S (2523) Lesnica SVK 2017 And here Black was comfortable and even later on won in ...}) 14... dxe5 15. Nc4 Qf6 16. Ne3 Ne7 (16... Nf4 {Seems like a reasonable alternative.} 17. Nf5 {Would lead to a complex game though, and probably the idea of Ne7 was to prevent Nf5.}) 17. Ng4 {Not sure about the objective value of this move.} (17. Be2 {Maybe at this point objectively it was better to play a humble move like Be2 to try to maintain equality, but of course Nepo needed the win, being a half a point behind, so he was willing to take some risks to unbalance the game.}) 17... Bxg4 18. hxg4 Ng6 19. Bc4 Rad8 20. a5 $6 (20. Be3 {Again, perhaps it was better objectively to steer the game to equalish grounds.}) 20... Nf4 21. Nh2 $6 {This move makes matters worse for White.} (21. Rf1 {Was objectively a better defence but here Black is the only one who can be better.} Ng5 22. Nxg5 Qxg5 23. Bxf4 exf4 24. Qe2 c6 {And only Black can be better. White can't really dream of winning such a position at an elite level, if Black is ok with a draw.}) 21... Rd7 22. Be3 Bxe3 23. fxe3 Ne6 $17 {Now Black is much better. White's pawn structure is really spoiled with a pair of doubled isolated pawns.} 24. Rf1 Qe7 25. b4 Nhg5 $6 {Here, however, Black lets go of a big portion of his advantage. This move wasn't so logical since now the knight on e6 isn't as happy, and the knights become redundant.} ( 25... Nf6 $1 26. Rf5 Qd6 (26... Ng5 {Should also be sufficient.}) 27. Raf1 Ng5 $19 {And Black is basically already winning material here.}) 26. Nf3 Nxf3+ 27. gxf3 {Now thanks to the threat of the e5 pawn, at least White was able to fix his pawn structure. He's still worse with a weak king though and really never risked winning the game.} Qg5 28. Rae1 Red8 29. Qh2 Rd2 30. Re2 Rd1 31. Bd5 Rxf1+ 32. Kxf1 c6 33. Bxe6 Rd1+ $1 {Important in-between move AKA a 'zwischenzug'.} (33... fxe6 34. Rd2 $11 {is just equal.}) 34. Kf2 fxe6 35. Qh5 $1 {White finds the best defensive resource here, transposing into a rook endgame with excellent drawing chances.} Qxh5 36. gxh5 Kf7 37. Rb2 Rc1 38. Rd2 Ke7 39. Rd3 Rh1 40. Kg2 Rxh5 41. c4 {White is in time to create counterplay.} Rg5+ 42. Kh2 Rh5+ 43. Kg2 Rg5+ 44. Kh2 h5 {Black could've forced a draw here, but at this moment Grischuk hasn't officially drawn yet, and had Grischuk won, Radjabov would've not won clear first. So he still tried to press. Besides Radjabov really has no risk here. However, maybe a slightly better way to press was with Rg6!?} ( 44... Rg6 $5 45. b5 axb5 $1 46. cxb5 Rf6 $1 {And here after this unusual move, Rf6, Black still has some winning chances. However, finding a variation like that isn't natural for the human eye, giving White a passed pawn, especially when all you really need is a draw, the last thing you want to do is to take an unnecessary risk.} (46... cxb5 47. Rb3 $11)) 45. b5 h4 46. Kh3 (46. bxa6 bxa6 47. c5 Rg3 48. Rd6 Rxf3 49. Rxc6 Rxe3 50. Rxa6 Rxe4 51. Ra7+ $1 Kd8 $1 52. c6 {Would've also secured a draw, and in fact Black had to play Kd8, or else he could even risk losing here, since White's 2 passed pawns are more dangerous than Black's 4.}) 46... Rg3+ (46... Rg1 {Might've offered slightly better winning chances but I'm pretty sure this should be a draw as well.} 47. bxa6 bxa6 48. Kxh4 Ra1 49. Rb3 Rxa5 50. Kg5 Ra1 51. c5 {And White has enough counterplay.}) 47. Kxh4 Rxf3 48. bxa6 bxa6 49. c5 {Now the game peters out to a draw by force.} Rf1 50. Rd6 Ra1 51. Rxc6 Rxa5 52. Kg5 Kd7 53. Rd6+ Ke7 54. Rc6 Kd7 55. Rd6+ Ke7 56. Rc6 {A very nice last round battle. Nepo really tried hard to create chances but Radjabov was really prepared well in the opening, and also was in excellent form in the event and could've only won this game. Congratulations to Radjabov with a huge result, and possibly even giving him some outside chances to qualify for the Candidates.} 1/2-1/2

Alexander Grischuk, que había entablado con Anish Giri hacía unos minutos,  pasó a felicitar a Teimour Radjabov

Radjabov y Nepomniachtchi comparten sus impresiones tras la partida

Vídeo completo de la ronda 9 con comentarios

Para Teimour Radjabov ha sido más que una victoria. Es el fin de la sequía de triunfos importantes que ha padecido durante los últimos años. Tras llegar a un pico de 2799 puntos Elo en el escalafón continuo oficioso en 2012, a finales de 2016 incluso salió momentáneamente del club de los 2700 puntos.

Ian Nepomniachtchi estará contento con su segundo puesto compartido final, tras comenzar el torneo con un parcial de 1.0/3. Su espíritu de lucha está fuera de duda y en el último mes ha competido en Paris, Lovaina, Khanty-Mansiysk y Ginebra contra los mejores del mundo.

Los jugadores distendidos tras el fin del torneo y la tensión

Alexander Grischuk también tiene que estar contento con su segundo puesto compartido, aunque posiblemente no tenga la misma sensación que Nepomniachtchi, después de haber estado igualado con el líder. No jugará en Palma de Mallorca y mantener el segundo puesto en la general no dependerá de él. 

Boris Gelfand y Ernesto Inarkiev analizando su partida

Levon Aronian (derecha) rompió su racha de dos derrotas consecutivas con una victoria sobre Saleh Salem

Todas las partidas

 

Clasificación final (9 rondas)

País Elo Rend. Nombre Puntos Des1 Des2
1
 
2724 2856 Teimour Radjabov 6.0 / 9    
2
 
2761 2818 Alexander Grischuk 5.5 / 9 41.00  
3
 
2742 2805 Ian Nepomniachtchi 5.5 / 9 38.00  
4
 
2737 2774 Penteala Harikrishna 5.0 / 9 46.00  
5
 
2800 2778 Shakhriyar Mamedyarov 5.0 / 9 44.50  
6
 
2735 2778 Chao B Li 5.0 / 9 43.50  
7
 
2775 2755 Anish Giri 5.0 / 9 40.00  
8
 
2749 2763 Peter Svidler 5.0 / 9 39.50 372.50
9
 
2736 2748 Michael Adams 5.0 / 9 39.50 363.50
10
 
2654 2741 Alexander Riazantsev 5.0 / 9 37.00  
11
 
2809 2738 Levon Aronian 4.5 / 9 44.00  
12
 
2728 2734 Boris Gelfand 4.5 / 9 40.50  
13
 
2703 2737 Dmitrij Jakovenko 4.5 / 9 40.00  
14
 
2739 2723 Pavel Eljanov 4.5 / 9 39.00  
15
 
2707 2639 Ernesto Inarkiev 3.5 / 9    
16
 
2694 2557 Richard Rapport 2.5 / 9 38.50  
17
 
2666 2563 Yifan Hou 2.5 / 9 38.00  
18
 
2638 2570 AR Saleh Salem 2.5 / 9 37.50  

Cinco son los jugadores que se disputan 2 plazas en el próximo Torneo de Candidatos. A continuación les mostramos como está la tabla en la parte alta (más abajo la tienen completa) Mamedyaron y Grischuk, primero y sengundo, no jugarán en Palma de Mallorca. Radjabov, Ding Liren y Maxime Vachier-Lagrave sí estarán allí, con opciones de desbancar al menos a uno de los anteriores y hacerse con uno de los codiciados puestos en el Torneo de Candidatos.

 
Jugador
Elo al 1 de julio de 2017
Sharjah
Moscú
Ginebra
Palma
Total
1
Shakhriyar Mamedyarov (AZE) (P)
2800
140
140
 60
 
340
2
Alexander Grischuk (RUS) (P)
2760
140
71
 125
 
336
5
Teimour Radjabov (AZE) (P)
2785
 
71
 170
 
241
4
Ding Liren (CHN) (P)
2796
70
170
 
 
240
5 Maxime Vachier-Lagrave (FRA) (P)
2742
140
71
 
 
211
9
Hikaru Nakamura (USA) (P)
2710
70 
71
 
 
141

¡El torneo de Palma resultará decisivo!

World Chess FIDE Grand Prix 2017

El World Chess FIDE Grand Prix 2017 es una serie de 4 torneos de ajedrez que forman parte del circuito del Campeonato del Mundo. Los dos mejores clasificados tendrán plaza en el Torneo de Candidatos 2018.

En cada torneo juegan 18 ajedrecistas. En total participarán 24 jugadores en el circuito y cada jugador participará en 3 torneos en total.

Los torneos se disputarán por sistema suizo a 9 rondas. Los jugadores recibirán 1 punto por victoria, medio punto por las tablas y cero puntos si caen derrotados.

Los puntos de Grand Prix determinarán la clasificación del circuito. Dos jugadores se han clasificado como finalistas del duelo por el Campeonato del Mundo 2016, 4 jugadores han llegado desde las semifinales en la Copa del Mundo 2015, 8 jugadores se han clasificado debido a sus valoraciones Elo, un jugador se ha clasificado a través de los torneos de la ACP y 9 ajedrecistas son designados directamente por Agon y FIDE (Deben tener una valoración Elo superior a 2700 puntos)

La bolsa de premios de cada torneo asciende a 130.000 euros, o sea que la serie de torneos del Grand Prixde totaliza 520.000 euros. 

Clasificación general

Nombre Elo Sharjah Moscú Ginebra Palma de Mallorca Total
1 Shakhriyar Mamedyarov  2800 140 140 60 0 340
2 Alexander Grischuk  2761 140 71.4 125 0 336
3 Teimour Radjabov  2724 0 71.4 170 0 241
4 Ding Liren  2783 70 170 0 0 240
5 Maxime Vachier-Lagrave  2796 140 71.4 0 0 211
6 Ian Nepomniachtchi 2732 70 3 125 0 198
7 Hikaru Nakamura  2785 70 71.4 0 0 141
8 Michael Adams 2736 70 3 60 0 133
9 Peter Svidler 2756 0 71.4 60 0 131
10 Anish Giri  2771 0 71.4 60 0 131
11 Li Chao  2720 25 0 60 0 85
12 Dmitry Jakovenko 2708 70 0 11 0 81
13 Hou Yifan 2666 7 71.4 2 0 80
14 Pentala Harikrishna  2737 0 20 60 0 80
15 Alexander Riazantsev  2671 1 0 60 0 61
16 Pavel Eljanov  2739 25 0 11 0 36
17 Boris Gelfand 2728 0 20 11 0 31
18 Francisco Vallejo Pons  2717 25 4 0 0 29
19 Richard Rapport 2694 25 0 2 0 27
20 Evgeny Tomashevsky  2706 3 20 0 0 23
21 Levon Aronian 2793 7 0 11 0 18
22 Jon Ludvig Hammer 2628 3 7 0 0 10
23 Salem Saleh    3 3 1 0 7
24 Ernesto Inarkiev  2707 0 1 4 0 5

Agon tiene la exclusiva de la retransmisión de las partidas de los torneos del Grand Prix de la FIDE y quiere que el sitio web oficial www.worldchess.com sea el único donde se puedan seguir en directo. Gracias a un acuerdo de colaboración entre Agon y ChessBase, nuestros clientes Premium podrán seguir las partidas en directo en Playchess.com.

Programa

Fecha Hora Actividad
05.07.2017   Inauguración
06.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 1
07.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 2
08.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 3
09.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 4
10.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 5
11.07.2017   Día de descanso
12.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 6
13.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 7
14.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 8
15.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 9
    Clausura

Premios y puntuación

Puesto Premio Puntos Grand Prix
1 €20,000 170
2 €15,000 140
3 €12,000 110
4 €11,000 90
5 €10,000 80
6 €9,000 70
7 €8,000 60
8 €7,000 50
9 €6,000 40
10 €5,000 30
11 €4,250 20
12 €4,000 10
13 €3,750 8
14 €3,500 6
15 €3,250 4
16 €3,000 3
17 €2,750 2
18 €2,500 1

En caso de empate, los puntos se repartirían a partes iguales. No hay valoraciones de desempate.

En la clasificación absoluta, los puestos se determinan de la siguiente manera (en caso de empate a puntos):

  1. Puntos por duelos (en los tres torneos jugados)
  2. Cantidad de partidas con negras
  3. Cantidad de partidas ganadas
  4. Cantidad de victorias con negras
  5. Por sorteo

Todas las retransmisiones en Playchess.com a golpe de vista (Guía)

ChessBase Account Premium 1 año

Con la cuenta ChessBase siempre tiene acceso a la videoteca, el entrenador táctico, el entrenador de aperturas, la base de datos online, Let’s Check, Playchess.com... ¡Todo lo que necesita es una conexión a Internet y un navegador actualizado, da igual que tenga iPad, tableta, PC, iMac, Windows, Android o Linux!

Más información...

Fotos: Valera Belobeev para World Chess

Enlaces


Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Comentar

Normas sobre los comentarios

 
 

¿Aún no eres usuario? Registro