Mamedyarov sin fisuras en Islandia

15/03/2015 – Ha quedado como único líder, pero no tiene mucha ventaja. Shakhriyar ganó una fántástica partida, que comenta Sagar Shah, y lidera en el país del hielo. El grupo de perseguidores, con 4.5/5, no es manco. Entre ellos está el segundo favorito, David Navara. Meteorología y ajedrez: sin tregua en Reikiavik...

ChessBase 14 Download ChessBase 14  Download

Programa de gestión de bases de datos de ajedrez que es referencia mundial. Todos usan ChessBase, desde el campeón del mundo al aficionado. Inicie su historia de éxito personal con ChessBase.

Más información...

Ronda 5

Tablero Nombre Elo Pts. Resultado Pts. Nombre Elo
1 Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2756 4 1 - 0 4 Gretarsson Hjorvar Steinn 2554
2 Eljanov Pavel 2727 4 ½ - ½ 4 Stopa Jacek 2544
3 Fier Alexandr 2601 4 ½ - ½ 4 Gao Rui 2533
4 Navara David 2736 1 - 0 Jussupow Artur 2573
5 Libiszewski Fabien 2514 ½ - ½ Melkumyan Hrant 2676
6 Naroditsky Daniel 2633 ½ - ½ Maze Sebastien 2564
7 Gupta Abhijeet 2625 1 - 0 Georgiadis Nico 2468
8 L'ami Erwin 2605 1 - 0 Brunello Sabino 2540
9 Gunnarsson Jon Viktor 2443 1 - 0 Grandelius Nils 2603
10 Movsesian Sergei 2665 3 1 - 0 3 Soors Stef 2408
11 Khademalsharieh Sarasadat 2357 3 ½ - ½ 3 Steingrimsson Hedinn *) 2530
12 Tania Sachdev 2404 3 ½ - ½ 3 Hammer Jon Ludvig 2651
13 Shen Victor C 2401 3 0 - 1 3 Granda Zuniga Julio E 2646
14 Cornette Matthieu 2585 3 1 - 0 3 Ahlander Bjorn 2380
15 Jensson Einar Hjalti 2390 3 0 - 1 3 Hansen Eric 2566
16 Stefansson Hannes 2560 3 1 - 0 3 Hauge Lars Oskar 2380
17 Le Roux Jean-Pierre 2548 3 1 - 0 3 Abdumalik Zhansaya 2379
18 Sarkar Justin 2376 3 1 - 0 3 Rasmussen Allan Stig 2532
19 Danielsen Henrik 2514 3 1 - 0 3 Christiansen Johan-Sebastian 2351
20 Gulamali Kazim 2350 3 0 - 1 3 Tari Aryan 2509

¡Un día sangriento como habitualmente! Se vio algo de ajedrez fascinante en los primeros tableros, pero fue el principal favorito Shakhriyar Mamedyarov el que salió como líder en solitario una vez transcurrida la primera mitad del torneo:

[Event "Reykjavik Open 2015"] [Site "Reykjavik ISL"] [Date "2015.03.13"] [Round "5.1"] [White "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Black "Gretarsson, Hjorvar Steinn"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D37"] [WhiteElo "2756"] [BlackElo "2554"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "51"] [EventDate "2015.03.10"] {With this win, Mamedyarov becomes the sole leader of the tournament. 5.0/5. The thing that this most impressive about this game is not just the fact that Mamedyarov beat a strong 2554 opponent in just 26 moves but all his moves were just so precise. There was not even one sub optimal move. All of them were the engine's first choice. This just shows how strong this Azerbaijani player really is.} 1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bf4 {The Bf4 variation in QGD has become very popular after Vishy Anand used it successfully in the World Championship.} O-O 6. e3 Nbd7 7. Qc2 {This is not as popular as c5 but is an important alternative and leads to a much more fluid positions out of the opening.} (7. c5 {was Anand's choice.}) 7... c5 8. Rd1 Qa5 (8... cxd4 {is the other option and White replies with} 9. Rxd4 {Such moves are very typical of Mamedyarov. Though this is opening theory, I have often seen him lifting his rook and placing it right in the center of the board!} Qa5 10. Bg3 Nb6 11. Nd2 dxc4 12. Bxc4 Nxc4 13. Nxc4 Qa6 14. O-O $1 $14) 9. Nd2 {This move is quite common in the Cambridge springs variation. White would like to break the pin on the c3 knight, at the same time he is ready to take on c4 with his knight and Nb3 could be possible in some cases.} cxd4 10. exd4 {At first sight this position looks very weird to me. Mainly because Black is ahead in development. White has his pieces clumsily placed. What exactly is the rook doing on d1? But praxis and experience has shown that slowly White will unwind and he will find his pieces on exactly the squares he wanted them to be on.} dxc4 {Just about everyone has taken on c4. The question to be asked is, Why should one take on c4 and speed up White's development? Let's have a look at the other options.} (10... b6 $2 11. Nb3 Qa6 12. cxd5 $16 {is no good.}) (10... Nb6 $2 11. Nb3 {leads to huge material losses or traps the queen.} Qa6 12. cxd5 Nc4 13. d6 $18) (10... Bb4 $6 11. Bd3 $14) (10... Nb8 $5 $146 {could be a very worthy alternative. The knight is relocated in such a fashion that it can jump to the ideal c6 square.} 11. Nb3 Qd8 12. c5 b6 $132 {Black seems to be doing fine! We might see this move 10...Nb8 in some top level game pretty soon! :)}) 11. Nxc4 Qd8 (11... Qf5 12. Qxf5 exf5 13. Be2 $14) 12. Bd3 Nb6 13. O-O Nxc4 $6 (13... Nbd5 {would be ideal but there are some issues with the h7 pawn.} 14. Nxd5 exd5 (14... Nxd5 $2 15. Bxh7+ Kh8 16. Be5 $16) 15. Ne5 $14 (15. Ne3 $5 $14 )) 14. Bxc4 {A few moves ago we said that the White pieces looked pretty disorganized. Have a look at them now. They are so perfectly placed.} Qb6 { From this point onwards, Mamedyarov's play is worth studying.} 15. Rfe1 $1 {A very nice move bringing the rook into the game.} Re8 (15... Qd8) (15... Rd8 16. d5 $36) 16. Nb5 $1 {A fork on c7 is threatened.} Nd5 17. Bxd5 Qxb5 (17... exd5 18. Nc7 $18) 18. Be4 $1 {A threat to the h7 pawn.} g6 (18... f5 19. Bd3 {The e6 pawn would be quite weak.}) 19. Re3 $1 {Fantastic move! The rook is perfect on the thrid rank. Not only can it go to the kingside but it can also swing over to the queenside and create some damage.} a5 {Not seeing anything good that can be done, Gretarsson comes up with the idea of playing a5-a4 in order to take away the b3 square from the rook. He can then develop his bishop to d7. But this is just too slow.} (19... Bd7 20. Rb3 $16 {loses a pawn.}) 20. Be5 { Trying to probe the Black kingside.} a4 (20... f6 21. Bxg6 $1 fxe5 22. Bxh7+ Kh8 23. Rh3 $18) 21. Rg3 {The threat now is to sacrifice a few things on g6!} f5 {This is sort of forced but now the e5 bishop can never be dislodged.} 22. Bd3 Qd7 23. Qe2 {Threatening Bb5.} Bh4 (23... Ra5 24. Qd2 Bd8 25. h4 $18 {With a powerful attack.}) 24. Bb5 Qe7 25. Rc3 $1 {The rook is threatening to infiltrate on c7.} Bd7 26. Bxd7 {After Black takes the bishop, the rook comes in on c7 and combined with the bishop, it will soon end in mate. I agree that Gretarsson's play was not the best, yet the simplicity with which Mamedyarov played was just mind boggling. His moves were such that they could be easily understood but extremely difficult to imitate. This is the sign of a true genius!} 1-0

Pavel Eljanov estuvo cerca de alzanzar a Mamedyarov ya que su posición parecía muy buena contra Jacek Stopa, pero el jugador polaco se defendió con fiereza y logró las tablas. Sagar Shah nos ofrece los comentarios de los jugadores que an alcanzado unos vitales 4.5/5:

[Event "Reykjavik Open 2015"] [Site "Reykjavik ISL"] [Date "2015.03.13"] [Round "5.18"] [White "Sarkar, Justin"] [Black "Rasmussen, Allan Stig"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D43"] [WhiteElo "2376"] [BlackElo "2532"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "34"] [EventDate "2015.03.10"] {Justin Sarkar is a very talented International Master from the USA. In this game he is able to beat his 200 points higher rated opponent in just 18 moves. } 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 e6 5. Bg5 h6 6. Bh4 dxc4 7. e4 g5 8. Bg3 b5 {The Moscow Variation is one of sharpest lines in the opening theory. It is one of thise lines which received an over exposure by being played in hundreds of games from 2010-2012 and hence it's usage has reduced at the top level in recent years.} 9. Be2 Bg7 {Now that is a relative side line. Main move here is} (9... Bb7 {and then White has choices like h4, 0-0, Ne5, e5 and Qc2.}) 10. e5 Nh5 11. a4 {Justin Sarkar is well prepared in the opening and chooses the move that has been tried by strong players like Vitiugov, Maletin, Gupta etc.} a6 12. Ne4 {Threatening Nd6+ with a huge advantage.} (12. axb5 cxb5 13. Nxb5 axb5 14. Rxa8 Bb7 $44 {is not in the spirit of the position for White and Black already has wonderful compensation thanks to his powerful bishop on b7.}) 12... O-O 13. Qc2 {This is a very shrewd move. The queen is eyeing the h7 square and sacrifices on g5 are on the cards at the moment.} Nxg3 $2 (13... g4 $5 {could have been an interesting idea.} 14. Bh4 $1 Qd5 15. Rd1 $5 gxf3 16. Bxf3 $16 { And the threat to the h5 knight as well as Nf6+ secures White an advantage.}) 14. hxg3 {It was almost a suicidal idea by Allan Stig to open the h-file for the White rook. Now there are as many as four attackers on the Black king and all his defenders are slumbering on the queenside!} Re8 15. Rxh6 $1 {A very pretty shot.} f5 (15... Bxh6 16. Nf6+ Kf8 17. Qh7 Bg7 18. Nxg5 $18 {is of course curtains.}) 16. Nf6+ Kf8 17. Rg6 Kf7 {Allowing a pretty finish.} (17... Kf7 18. Nxg5+ Kxg6 19. Bh5+ Kxg5 (19... Kh6 20. Nf7#) 20. Qd2+ f4 21. Qxf4#) 1-0

No nos olvidemos de que Alina l'Ami no es el único L'Ami en el torneo. De hecho, ella no es la que tiene mejor Elo:

¿El mejor L'Ami? Dejemos que usted lo decida tras ver esta partida...

[Event "Reykjavik Open 2015"] [Site "Reykjavik ISL"] [Date "2015.03.13"] [Round "5.8"] [White "L'Ami, Erwin"] [Black "Brunello, Sabino"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D18"] [WhiteElo "2605"] [BlackElo "2540"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "119"] [EventDate "2015.03.10"] {Erwin L'Ami is an opening expert and his ideas from the White side against solid openings like the Slav and Queen's Indian are often noteworthy. Here he beats a very strong opponent in a smooth positional game.} 1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 dxc4 5. a4 Bf5 6. e3 e6 7. Bxc4 Nbd7 8. O-O Bb4 9. Qe2 O-O 10. e4 Bg6 11. Bd3 Bh5 12. e5 Nd5 13. Nxd5 cxd5 14. Qe3 {Of course this is all heavily theoretical and hence nothing much to comment about. Here Black has the choice of retreating on e7 with his bishop or playing Re8. Sabino chooses the latter.} Re8 (14... Be7 15. Ng5 $14 {is leading to positions with pretty one sided play.}) 15. Bd2 Qe7 (15... Bxd2 {This exchange is not too good for Black because it lets White gain space on the queenside.} 16. Nxd2 {This position has been reached by L'Ami himself in his game against Frank Holzke which ended in a draw.} Nb8 17. Rfc1 Nc6 18. Bb5 Rc8 19. a5 $14 {With a very pleasant position for White.}) (15... Qa5 {is more common but it would just transpose to the game. Not to forget, L'Ami already has had a game here against a 2200 player. But I must also mention that the L'Ami in that game was Alina and not Erwin!}) 16. Bxb4 Qxb4 17. Qd2 ({Alina L'Ami played in the following manner but after} 17. Ng5 Nf8 18. f4 Bg6 19. Bxg6 fxg6 $2 $14 {1-0 (40) L'Ami,A (2393)-Dragomirescu,A (2208) Calimanesti 2014} (19... Nxg6 $11 { I have a feeling that Black is doing pretty well in this position.})) 17... Qe7 (17... Qxd2 18. Nxd2 {How do we assess this position? Not so easy to say but I think Black is closer to equality than White is to an advantage.} Nb8 19. Rfc1 Nc6 20. Bb5 Rec8 21. Bxc6 Rxc6 22. Rxc6 bxc6 23. Ra3 {And White needs only to play Rb3 to gain an advantage but Black prevents it with the accurate} Bd1 $1 $11 (23... Rb8 $2 24. Rb3 $1 Rxb3 25. Nxb3 Bd1 26. Nc5 $16 {White should win this dominating endgame.})) 18. Ne1 Rac8 19. Nc2 Bg6 20. Bxg6 {The way in which Black recaptures often decides White's plan in this position. Here taking with the h-pawn was safer because with the knight on c2 there are no prospects of launching an attack on the kingside by bringing the knight to the g5-square.} fxg6 $6 (20... hxg6 {was better.}) 21. Rfc1 Rc7 $6 22. Na3 $1 {The knight threatens to come to the b5 square and hence Sabino has to cede the c-file.} Rxc1+ (22... Rec8 23. Rxc7 Rxc7 24. Nb5 $16) 23. Rxc1 Nb8 24. Nb5 Nc6 25. Nd6 $16 {White has achieved a very stable advantage in the position. His knight is obviously a monster and makes Black's life very difficult.} Rf8 26. g3 $1 (26. b4 {looked obvious but it allows counterplay with} Qh4 $1 { attacking the d4 pawn.} 27. Rd1 Nxb4 $132) (26. a5 $5 {was an interesting option though.} a6 (26... Qh4 $2 27. a6 $18) 27. g3 $16 {White has gained more space thanks to the pawn on a5.}) 26... Qc7 27. Rc5 a5 28. Kg2 $1 {I always love it when players find time to improve their position in this little manner. } Qb6 29. Qc3 (29. Rb5 Qxd4 30. Qxd4 Nxd4 31. Rxa5 $16) 29... g5 30. h3 h6 31. Nb5 (31. Nxb7 $1 {was a strong shot.} Nxd4 (31... Qxb7 32. Rxc6 $16) 32. Qxd4 Qxb7 33. Rxa5 $16) 31... Kh8 32. Qe3 Kg8 33. Rc3 Kh8 34. Qe2 Kg8 35. Rf3 Rxf3 36. Qxf3 Nb4 (36... Nxd4 37. Qe3 $18) 37. Qg4 Qc6 38. Nd6 Qd7 39. h4 gxh4 40. gxh4 Nc6 41. h5 Ne7 42. f4 {White didn't play in the most accurate manner in the last few moves and the computer assesses this position to be equal. All that Black has to do is exchange the knight on d6 with Nc8. But first it was important to not to give the f4-f5 resource to White.} Nc8 $2 (42... Kh8 $1 { A good waiting move attacking the pawn on a4.} 43. Qd1 (43. Kg3 Qxa4 44. Qxe6 Qb3+ 45. Kg4 Qd1+ 46. Kg3 Qg1+ $11) 43... Nc8 $1 $11) 43. f5 $1 Nxd6 44. fxe6 Qxa4 $2 {Giving two connected passers on the sixth rank is very dangerous.} ( 44... Qe7 45. exd6 Qxd6 46. Qf5 {Looks lost but Black can defend with} Qa6 $1 47. Qf7+ Kh7 48. e7 Qe2+ $11 {with a perpetual. While this is easy for the engines to see, for humans it is not and Sabino tries to create desperate counterplay in the game.}) 45. exd6 Qc2+ 46. Kg3 Qc1 47. e7 Qg1+ 48. Kf3 Qf1+ ( 48... Qd1+ 49. Kf2 $1 {Very nicely calculated.} Qxg4 50. e8=Q+ Kh7 51. Qg6+ Qxg6 52. hxg6+ Kxg6 53. d7 $18) 49. Ke3 Qc1+ 50. Kd3 Qb1+ 51. Kc3 Qc1+ 52. Kb3 a4+ 53. Ka3 Qa1+ 54. Kb4 Qxb2+ 55. Kc5 Qc3+ 56. Kxd5 Qb3+ 57. Ke4 Qb1+ 58. Ke5 Qe1+ 59. Kd5 Qh1+ 60. Ke6 {Though Sabino did have his chances to equalize in the game, I quite liked the steady fashion in which Erwin played.} 1-0

Por último un ejemplo muy instructivo. En el ajedrez de principiantes 1+1+1 = 3, pero en el de grandes maestros eso no siempre es cierto. A veces es más bien 2.5, pero cuando las negras lo fastidian sube a 5:

[Event "Reykjavik Open 2015"] [Site "Reykjavik ISL"] [Date "2015.03.13"] [Round "5.9"] [White "Gunnarsson, Jon Viktor"] [Black "Grandelius, Nils"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B90"] [WhiteElo "2443"] [BlackElo "2603"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [SetUp "1"] [FEN "r3k2r/1bq1bppp/pn1pp3/1p2n1P1/3NP2P/P1N1BP2/1PPQB3/2KR3R w kq - 0 15"] [PlyCount "49"] [EventDate "2015.03.10"] {Nils Grandelius is an agressive and attacking player. You see him quite often sacrificing pieces and pawns left and right. So it's a refreshing change when his opponent does the same, even though in this case Jon Gunarsson's sacrifice was most probably incorrect.} 15. Ndxb5 $6 (15. f4 Nec4 16. Bxc4 Nxc4 17. Qd3 { was the safer way to play.}) 15... axb5 16. Nxb5 Qc6 17. Bxb6 (17. Nxd6+ Bxd6 18. Qxd6 Qxd6 19. Rxd6 Nbc4 20. Bxc4 Nxc4 21. Rd3 Nxe3 22. Rxe3 $15 {is similar to the game but the rook is not so active on e3.}) 17... Qxb6 18. Nxd6+ Bxd6 19. Qxd6 Qxd6 20. Rxd6 $15 {This is quite a common sacrifice and often the three queenside pawns are stronger than the piece but this is not the case as Black gets to co-ordinate his pieces in an easy manner.} Ke7 21. Rhd1 Rhc8 $1 {Exploiting a small tactical trick.} (21... Rhd8 22. Rxd8 Rxd8 23. Rxd8 Kxd8 24. b4 {This endgame is pretty safe for White and he doesn't risk much.}) 22. c3 (22. f4 Bxe4 $1 {was the neat tactical point.} 23. fxe5 Rxc2+ 24. Kb1 Rxe2+ $19) 22... Bc6 23. h5 Nd7 24. R1d2 Ra5 {You can see how all of Black's pieces are co-ordinating perfectly. The pawns on a3-b2-c3 are not at all looking threatening.} 25. g6 Rxh5 26. gxf7 Nf8 (26... Ne5 {would have been much stronger.} 27. f4 Rh1+ 28. Rd1 Rxd1+ 29. Rxd1 Nxf7 $19 {and this will most probably end in an easy win for Black.}) 27. b4 Rh1+ (27... Kxf7 $1 {was Black's last chance to claim an advantage.} 28. Ba6 Rc7 29. c4 Be8 30. c5 Ng6 $17) 28. Kb2 h5 (28... Kxf7 29. Ba6 Rc7 30. b5 $16) 29. Ba6 Rc7 30. b5 Bxb5 31. Bxb5 h4 32. a4 $16 {White has a clear advantage.} h3 33. Rd1 Rh2+ 34. R6d2 Rxd2+ 35. Rxd2 Ng6 36. a5 Ne5 37. a6 Nxf3 38. Rf2 Rc5 39. c4 1-0

Impresiones fotográficas por Alina l'Ami

¡Un artículo sobre Reikiavik no está completo sin las hermosas fotografías de Alina l'Ami!

Aryan Tari en el postmortem

El equipo de comentaristas en plena faena

Los espectadores pueden seguir las partidas con comentarios en pantallas o subir 20 peldaños y ver los primeros tableros en vivo.

Es costumbre local descalzarse y ponerse cómodo, incluso en público

La última víctima de Shakhriyar Mamedyarov: Hjorvar Steinn Gretarsson

El líder no parece muy impresionado

Alexander Fier entabló frente a Rui Gao

Arthur Jussupow no pudo aguantar contra David Navara

Pendiendo de un hilo: Pavel Eljanov fue incapaz de doblegar a Jacek Stopa

La hermosa Harpa...

Desde distintos ángulos

Vista desde el hotel oficial

El viento helador del Atlántico Norte

Tiempo de tormenta con rayo de esperanza

Sin amaños: la realidad y su reflejo en el Harpa

Siluetas: Alexander Fier y su esposa Nino Maisuradze

Clasificación tras la ronda 5

Nombre FED Elo Pts. Rp Elo+/-
1 Mamedyarov Shakhriyar AZE 2756 5.0 2900 7.3
2 Eljanov Pavel UKR 2727 4.5 2721 0.5
3 Navara David CZE 2736 4.5 2761 3.1
4 Gunnarsson Jon Viktor ISL 2443 4.5 2752 23.6
5 Gupta Abhijeet IND 2625 4.5 2642 2.0
6 Fier Alexandr BRA 2601 4.5 2812 11.6
7 L'ami Erwin NED 2605 4.5 2817 11.5
8 Stopa Jacek POL 2544 4.5 2611 6.4
  Gao Rui CHN 2533 4.5 2679 11.3
10 Gretarsson Hjorvar Steinn ISL 2554 4.0 2585 3.5
11 Naroditsky Daniel USA 2633 4.0 2649 2.3
12 Hansen Eric CAN 2566 4.0 2633 5.0
13 Stefansson Hannes ISL 2560 4.0 2698 6.3
14 Pakleza Zbigniew POL 2498 4.0 2530 3.6
15 Libiszewski Fabien FRA 2514 4.0 2557 4.2
16 Sequera Paolini Jose Rafael VEN 2408 4.0 2418 3.3
17 Tari Aryan NOR 2509 4.0 2528 3.0
  Petrov Nikita RUS 2435 4.0 2514 7.2
19 Cornette Matthieu FRA 2585 4.0 2583 0.6
20 Melkumyan Hrant ARM 2676 4.0 2575 -5.1

Emparejamientos de la ronda 6

Tablero Nombre Elo Pts. Resultado Pts.   Nombre Elo
1 Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2756 5 ½ - ½ GM Navara David 2736
2 Gao Rui 2533 ½ - ½ GM Eljanov Pavel 2727
3 Gupta Abhijeet 2625 0 - 1 GM Fier Alexandr 2601
4 Stopa Jacek 2544 0 - 1 GM L'ami Erwin 2605
5 Melkumyan Hrant 2676 4 ½ - ½ IM Gunnarsson Jon Viktor 2443
6 Pakleza Zbigniew 2498 4 ½ - ½ 4 GM Movsesian Sergei 2665
7 Granda Zuniga Julio E 2646 4 1 - 0 4 IM Tari Aryan 2509
8 Kjartansson Gudmundur 2491 4 0 - 1 4 GM Naroditsky Daniel 2633
9 Cornette Matthieu 2585 4 ½ - ½ 4 GM Idani Pouya 2496
10 Hansen Eric 2566 4 1 - 0 4 GM Rombaldoni Axel 2488
11 Arngrimsson Dagur 2366 ½ - ½ GM Steingrimsson Hedinn *) 2530
12 Maze Sebastien 2564 4 1 - 0 4 GM Colovic Aleksandar 2482
13 Preotu Razvan 2447 4 0 - 1 4 GM Stefansson Hannes 2560
14 Gretarsson Hjorvar Steinn 2554 4 ½ - ½ 4 IM Sarkar Justin 2376
15 Petrov Nikita 2435 4 ½ - ½ 4 GM Le Roux Jean-Pierre 2548
16 Wang Yiye 2433 4 ½ - ½ 4 GM Danielsen Henrik 2514
17 Sequera Paolini Jose Rafael 2408 4 ½ - ½ 4 GM Libiszewski Fabien 2514
18 Hammer Jon Ludvig 2651 1 - 0 IM Hagen Andreas Skytte 2412
19 Jones Gawain C B 2642 1 - 0 IM Tania Sachdev 2404
20 Grandelius Nils 2603 1 - 0 IM Thorfinnsson Bjorn 2403

Tenemos la mayor parte de los resultados de la ronda 6, pero llos comentaremos con más detalle cuando tengamos los análisis y las fotos. Parece que Alexander Fier y Erwin l'Ami se abrieron paso con grandes victorias con negras para alcanzar los puestos de honor, ya que Shakhriyar Mamedyarov entabló con David Navara.

Algunas partidas de la ronda 5 para reproducir

Fotografías por Alina l'Ami
Información por cortesía de los organizadores
Comentarios por Sagar Shah (en inglés)

¡No se olviden de que pueden seguir la acción en el servidor Playchess.com!

Enlaces


Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Comentar

Normas sobre los comentarios

 
 

¿Aún no eres usuario? Registro