Mundial P4: tablas

por Nadja Wittmann
12/11/2014 – La partida comenzó con una Siciliana, más agresiva que la Española que solíamos ver en este tipo de partidas. Carlsen eligió un sistema tranquilo. Anand parecía estar lo bastante a gusto como para jugar con el peón de dama aislado y logró conducir la partida hacia un final igualado, no exento de tensiones, que concluyó en tablas. Tras 4 partidas: 2-2...

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Campeonato del Mundo 2014 en Sochi

Partida 4: tablas

Una interesante partidas desde el comienzo. Carlsen nunca se había encontrado en una situación en la que tenía que recuperarse de una derrota contra Anand, pero eso fue exactamente lo que tuvo que afrontar hoy.

La cuarta partida a punto de comenzar

Carlsen

Shipov y Kosteniuk comentando las partidas en Sochi

Lo que jugó Carlsen, 3.g3 sí que tiene veneno pero Anand sabía manejarlo

Vishy Anand

Eso sí que se puede llamar "mirar la posición desde cerca"

Fotos: Vladimir Barsky (sitio web oficial)

La partida 4 con comentarios de Alejandro Ramírez (en inglés)

[Event "World Chess Championship 2014"] [Site "Sochi"] [Date "2014.11.12"] [Round "4"] [White "Carlsen, Magnus"] [Black "Anand, Viswanathan"] [Result "*"] [ECO "B40"] [WhiteElo "2863"] [BlackElo "2785"] [Annotator "Ramirez Alvarez, Alejandro"] [PlyCount "94"] [EventDate "2014.??.??"] [EventCountry "RUS"] 1. e4 c5 $5 {Already a sharper approach to the game. Carlsen showed excellent understanding in the positional and quiet waters of the Spanish in game two. Anand hits back in his second black game with the Sicilian.} 2. Nf3 e6 {This move indicates that Black will play one of the following, in case of White going 3.d4 (the open Sicilian): 3...cxd4 4.Nxd4 and then: 4...Nc6 which is the Paulsen, 4...a6 with the Kan or 4...Nf6 followed by 5...d6 which is the Scheveningen. Unfortunately we will not know which one Anand had planned until, maybe, the next game Carlsen has white!} 3. g3 {This way of avoiding the theoretical battle has been very popular in the last few years. I go into an in-depth discussion of this variation in my recently released DVD on the Paulsen Sicilian that you can find at the ChessBase Shop.} Nc6 4. Bg2 d5 5. exd5 exd5 6. O-O Nf6 7. d4 Be7 {There are many ways that Black can develop once he plays d5. Some of the more popular ones are as Anand played, but without Nc6, or playing Bd6 and Nge7. This specific variation is a little more rare, but the character of the position should not change.} 8. Be3 (8. Nc3 O-O 9. dxc5 Bxc5 10. a3 $5 {was played in Zvjaginsev-Rublevsky this year. Zvjaginsev is one of the experts on the white side of this variation.}) 8... cxd4 {The first move for which Anand took a small think. It was more or less forced, but he is trying to evaluate how to continue from here. Probably Anand expected 8.Nc3.} 9. Nxd4 Bg4 {Black develops with tempo as it is not trivial to defend the queen. The queen does not want to move, but hardly has a choice. } (9... O-O 10. Nc3 Bg4 11. Qd3 {was Jones-Caruana from the Reykjavik Open from 2012. The move-order difference allows Carlsen to put his knight on d2 rather than on c3, but it does not seem to make a big difference.}) 10. Qd3 ( 10. f3 {is too ugly to be played, as it locks in the bishop on g2 and weakens the bishop on e3.}) 10... Qd7 11. Nd2 O-O 12. N2f3 Rfe8 13. Rfe1 Bd6 {White has play against the isolated pawn, but in return all of Black's pieces are well placed. He will soon bring his rook to c8 finishing his development comfortably and he has relatively little to worry about in the short-run. He has to keep up some kind of pressure so White doesn't simplify into an endgame where the pawn might be weak.} 14. c3 h6 15. Qf1 $5 {The queen did not feel comfortable on d3 as it was vulnerable to certain knight jumps. He also prepares Bh3 - just in case.} Bh5 16. h3 Bg6 17. Rad1 Rad8 18. Nxc6 bxc6 {With the structure changing to hanging pawns d5 is not nearly as weak, and since the c-file is not open c6 is not a big target. White has to exert pressure on the center quickly or he risks being worse.} 19. c4 Be4 20. Bd4 {A strangely annoying move for Black, and a move that allows White to keep equality.} Nh7 { The knight is ready to jump to g5!} 21. cxd5 Bxd5 (21... cxd5 {looks more natural to me than what Anand played, but there is nothing wrong with Bxd5 either.}) 22. Rxe8+ Rxe8 23. Qd3 Nf8 {Black re-routes the knight. With Anand's passive play the pawn structure will give White an edge, but it is difficult to do much with it. That being said, if anyone can form an initiative out of nothing, it is Carlsen!} 24. Nh4 Be5 25. Bxd5 Qxd5 26. Bxe5 Qxe5 27. b3 {Every trade makes the Black pawn structure more vulnerable.} Ne6 28. Nf3 Qf6 29. Kg2 Rd8 30. Qe2 Rd5 $5 {A little sharp. With the passed pawn on d5 Black will be able to create some counterplay, but a lot of endgames are lost for him because of White's queenside majority which allows him to create an outside passed pawn. A simple pawn endgame, for example, would be lost for Black.} 31. Rxd5 cxd5 32. Ne5 (32. Qe5 $5 {It made a lot of sense to try to trade queens. It is not trivial to calculate the knight endgame, but it doesn't look pleasant.} Qd8 $5 {Might be both more sedate and more reasonable. White retains a very slight edge, but maybe not enough to claim an advantage.} 33. Nd4 $14) 32... Qf5 33. Nd3 Nd4 34. g4 $5 {A great practical decision! Black has three major options, and with the clock ticking this is not always easy. Black can trade queens on e4, trade queens immediately, or retreat.} Qd7 (34... Nxe2 35. gxf5 Nc3 $5 {Because of White's structure Black is probably fine in this position. However, it is still dangerous as White's pawns on the kingside look threatening.} (35... Kf8 $5)) (34... Qe4+ $2 35. Qxe4 dxe4 36. Nc5 $16 { is just bad.}) 35. Qe5 {White gains some space, but Black's pieces are well placed and White's king is now a bit vulnerable, allowing counterplay.} Ne6 { A nice position for the knight. If White ever goes f4-f5 he will be faced with a defenseless king, while if the knight is allowed to stay on e6 it controls many, many key squares.} 36. Kg3 Qb5 37. Nf4 Nxf4 {Not a bad time to trade knights. With White's exposed king the queen endgame will almost inevitably be drawn.} 38. Kxf4 Qb4+ 39. Kf3 d4 $5 {Black sacrifices a pawn, but he hopes the activity of the queen and the passed pawn will give him enough to draw.} 40. Qe8+ Kh7 {With time control reached, Carlsen took a breather to look at his alternatives.} 41. Qxf7 Qd2 $1 {This move is actually forced. Grandmaster Rustam Kasimdzhanov, who is doing live commentary for the www.playchess.com website, mentioned that Anand would find this by process of elimination if nothing else. Rustam has a good feel for Anand's thought process: he was the Indian's second for a long time!} (41... Qc3+ 42. Ke4 d3 43. Qf3 $1 {and White loses his pawn on d3. All he can do is trade it for the one on a2, but he would be simply down one soldier.} Qe1+ 44. Kxd3 Qb1+ 45. Ke3 $16) (41... Qe1 42. Qf5+ Kh8 43. Qd3 {allows an ugly blockade.}) 42. Qf5+ Kh8 (42... Kg8 $2 { is a clear mistake because it allows White's queen to go to e2.} 43. Qd5+ Kh7 44. Qe4+ Kg8 45. Qe2 $1 {And Black has no good way of making progress with the d-pawn, will probably lose it and with it the game.}) 43. h4 {From a practical point of view, Anand is not worried at all that White will win a long endgame, he will be worried however that he gets mated! Carlsen wants to play g5 and g6 which puts real pressure on the stranded king on h8.} Qxa2 44. Qe6 $5 {Carlsen always likes to keep tension in the position. In this case the queen controls many squares, and White is still threatening g5 and g6.} Qd2 {The queen swings to the defense. It is important to note that g5 is covered.} (44... a5 $2 45. g5 a4 (45... hxg5 46. hxg5 a4 47. Qe8+ Kh7 48. bxa4 $18) 46. Qe8+ {is one of the ways that Black gets mated.}) 45. Qe8+ Kh7 46. Qe4+ Kh8 47. Qe8+ Kh7 {A well earned draw from both sides!} * 1/2-1/2

Vídeo con análisis de Daniel King

Entre los ilustres espectadores en el servidor de ChessBase, Playchess.com:

La flor y nata de la elite mundial

La estadística de Playchess.com de hoy:

Hoy ha habido 14.000 visitantes en el servidor Playchess.com y en el momento punta 9000 personas conectadas a la vez. Además de la partida entre Carlsen y Anand, se han disputado otras 80.000 partidas de ajedrez en Playchess.com por nuestros usuarios.

Todas las partidas para reproducir y descargar

Resultados

  Elo
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
Puntos
Rend.
M. Carlsen 2863
½
1
0
½
               
2.0
2792
V. Anand 2792
½
0
1
½
               
2.0
2863

Los comentaristas

Sergio Estremera con asistencia de su esposa Mónica Calzetta, siempre que quiera y pueda, comentará las partidas restantes del Campeonato del Mundo, salvo la décima (21 de noviembre), que volverá a estar a cargo de Ana Matnadze y Marc Narciso. Los comentarios comienzan a la misma hora que las partidas, a las 13:00 CET, en la sala "Retransmisiones".

Sergio Estremera


Mónica Calzetta

Hoy Garry Kasparov estuvo entre los seguidores de las partidas en la sala de retransmisiones de Playches.com

Leontxo García

Leontxo nos deleitará con algungas crónicas por escrito durante el Campeonato del Mundo. Leontxo estará en Sochi y nos contará lo que está pasando sobre el escenario y entre bastidores.

Leontxo García mandará informes desde Sochi

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Programa

El Campeonato del Mundo 2014 se disputará a un máximo de  12 partidas. Quien primero sume 6,5 puntos habrá ganado el duelo. Si alguno lo consiguiese en menos de 12 partidas, la clausura se adelantaría convenientemente.

Comentarios

Las partidas comenzarán a las 13:00 CET y los comentarios también comenzarán a partir de las 13:00.

Fecha
Actividad
Castellano
Inglés
Alemán
Francés
08.11.2014
Partida 1
Ana Matnadze/Marc Narciso
Daniel King/Parimarjan Negi
Thomas Luther
Yannick Pelletier
09.11.2014
Partida 2
Sergio Estremera
Simon Williams/Nicholas Pert
Oliver Reeh/Karsten Müller
Christian Bauer
10.11.2014
Día de descanso
 
 
 
 
11.11.2014
Partida 3
Sergio Estremera
Daniel King/Loek van Wely
Markus Ragger/Harald Schneider-Zinner
Fabien Libiszewski
12.11.2014
Partida 4
Sergio Estremera
Daniel King/Rustam Kasimdzhanov
Klaus Bischoff
Romain Edouard
13.11.2014
Día de descanso
 
 
 
 
14.11.2014
Partida 5
Sergio Estremera
Simon Williams/Irina Krush
Klaus Bischoff
Sebastien Mazé
15.11.2014
Partida 6
Sergio Estremera
Daniel King/Yannick Pelletier
Klaus Bischoff
Fabien Libiszewski
16.11.2014
Día de descanso
 
 
 
 
17.11.2014
Partida 7
Sergio Estremera
Simon Williams/Loek van Wely
Klaus Bischoff
Sebastien Mazé
18.11.2014
Partida 8
Sergio Estremera
Daniel King/Loek van Wely
Klaus Bischoff
Romain Edouard
19.11.2014
Día de descanso
 
 
 
 
20.11.2014
Partida 9
Sergio Estremera
Simon Williams/Irina Krush
Oliver Reeh/Merijn van Delft
Christian Bauer
21.11.2014
Partida 10
Ana Matnadze/Marc Narciso
Daniel King/Simon Williams
Oliver Reeh/Merijn van Delft
Yannick Pelletier
22.11.2014
Día de descanso
 
 
 
 
23.11.2014
Partida 11
Sergio Estremera
Chris Ward/Parimarjan Negi
Yannick Pelletier
Sebastien Mazé
24.11.2014
Día de descanso
 
 
 
 
25.11.2014
Partida 12
Sergio Estremera
Simon Williams/Rustam Kasimdzhanov
Oliver Reeh/Karsten Müller
Sebastien Mazé

Traducción: Nadja Wittmann (ChessBase) 

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