Radjabov arranca con 2/2 en Ginebra

08/07/2017 – Solo 2 rondas de la tercera entrega del AGONizante Grand Prix de la FIDE y ya parece que es la mejor hasta el momento. Tras un festival de siesta en Sharjah, tuvo algo de picante en Moscú, pero en Ginebra han arrancado esprintando a toda máquina. Si la ronda 1 fue una sorpresa agradable, la 2 resultó sensacional, con 5 partidas decantadas y poco faltó para que fueran 6, con excelentes victorias de Aronian y Radjabov, que tiene 2.0/2. Análisis del GM Alex Yermolinsky.

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Ronda 2

Los resultados

Tab. Tít Nombre País Resultado Tít. Nombre País
1 GM Dmitry Jakovenko
 
0 - 1 GM Levon Aronian
 
2 GM Hou Yifan
 
½ - ½ GM Alexander Riazantsev
 
3 GM Teimour Radjabov
 
1 - 0 GM Pavel Eljanov
 
4 GM Li Chao
 
½ - ½ GM Peter Svidler
 
5 GM Pentala Harikrishna
 
½ - ½ GM Michael Adams
 
6 GM Salem Saleh
 
0 - 1 GM Anish Giri
 
7 GM Shakhriyar Mamedyarov
 
1 - 0 GM Ernesto Inarkiev
 
8 GM Ian Nepomniachtchi
 
½ - ½ GM Boris Gelfand
 
9 GM Alexander Grischuk
 
1 - 0 GM Richard Rapport
 

Teimour Radjabov - Pavel Eljanov

[Event "FIDE Geneva Grand Prix 2017"] [Site "Geneva"] [Date "2017.07.07"] [Round "2"] [White "Radjabov, Teimour"] [Black "Eljanov, Pavel"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E16"] [WhiteElo "2724"] [BlackElo "2739"] [Annotator "Alex Yermolinsky"] [PlyCount "81"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 4. g3 Bb7 5. Bg2 Bb4+ 6. Bd2 Be7 7. Nc3 c6 8. e4 d5 9. exd5 $1 {A modern treatment of this well-known variation.} cxd5 10. Ne5 O-O 11. O-O Nc6 12. Bf4 {A relatively fresh idea.} (12. cxd5 Nxe5 13. d6 (13. dxe5 Nxd5 14. Rc1 Nxc3 15. Bxc3 Bxg2 16. Kxg2 Qc8 17. Qf3 {only leaves White with the smallest of advantages.}) 13... Nc6 14. dxe7 Qxe7 15. Bg5 h6 16. d5 Na5 $1 {was seen in Anand -Carlsen, WCh Sochi, 2014}) 12... Na5 13. Rc1 (13. Bg5 $5 {is counterintuitive - why move the bishop again - but it brought White success in Van Wely-Tkachiev} Rc8 (13... Ba6 $5) 14. Bxf6 Bxf6 15. cxd5 Bxd5 16. Nxd5 exd5 17. Re1 $14) 13... dxc4 14. Bxb7 Nxb7 15. Nxc4 {[#] This isn't your Grandfather's IQP position. Seemingly White has committed a cardinal sin of trading his light-squared bishop, but he's not playing for a kingside attack just yet. Black has his own set of problems: an awkward Nb7 and general weakness of the light squares caused by b7-b6.} Bb4 (15... Na5 16. Ne3 $1 { aiming at d4-d5.}) 16. Bg5 $1 {It's all about the d5-square.} Nd6 17. Nxd6 Bxd6 ({It's undertandable Pavel didn't want to weaken his king. Possible lines, such as} 17... Qxd6 18. Bxf6 gxf6 19. Ne4 Qd8 20. Rc4 Be7 21. Nc3 Rc8 22. Ra4 $1 a5 23. d5 {did seem unnerving.}) 18. d5 $1 exd5 19. Nxd5 Be5 20. Bxf6 Bxf6 21. b4 {[#] What we have here is a symmetrical pawn structure in a open position, with Black supposedly keeping a better minor piece. So, why isn't this equal? The answer to this mystery lies in the activity of the white pieces and Black's struggles to find a safe square for his queen.} Qd6 ({ Suppose, he does everything by the book:} 21... g6 22. Qf3 Bg7 {hides the bishop,} 23. Rfd1 Qg5 {lets the queen out,} 24. h4 Qe5 25. Rc7 b5 {improves the queenside pawn structure,} 26. Re7 Qd6 27. Rd7 $1 Qe5 28. Kg2 {and then what? Black is practically out of moves. Sample lines ot illustrate his problems are:} h5 (28... a6 29. Nb6 Rab8 30. R7d5 Qe7 31. Nd7) (28... a5 29. bxa5 Rxa5 30. Ne7+ Kh8 31. Nc6) 29. Re7 Qd6 30. Rb7 Qe5 31. a3 $1 ({not even} 31. Rxb5) 31... Rae8 32. Rxb5 {with a decisive advantage for White everywhere.} ) 22. Qf3 Rac8 23. Rcd1 $1 {No way Teimour was going to trade rooks.} Rfe8 24. b5 $6 {One and only inaccuracy allowed by Radjabov until time trouble.} ({ Instead, the prophylactic} 24. Kg2 $1 {would pose an interesting dilemma to his opponent: should Black just stay put or should be attempt a bailout,} Be7 $5 25. Rfe1 Bf8 26. Ne7+ Bxe7 27. Rxd6 Bxd6 28. Rxe8+ Rxe8 29. Qc6 Re6 30. Qa8+ Bf8 31. a3 Re7 {Can this be held? White will certainly try his best.}) 24... Be7 25. Rd4 (25. Rfe1 Bf8 26. Ne7+ $4 {now meets with} Rxe7 27. Rxd6 Rxe1+ 28. Kg2 Bxd6 $19) 25... Bf8 26. Rfd1 Rc5 $2 {[#] An unfortunate idea.} ({It was high time to work out a queen trade,} 26... Qe6 27. Kg2 (27. Rg4 Qe2) 27... Qe2 28. Ra4 Qxf3+ 29. Kxf3 {and Black doesn't have to fear losing the a-pawn:} Rc5 ({or} 29... Rc2 30. Rxa7 Bc5 31. Ne3 Rc3) 30. Rxa7 Rxb5 31. Nc7 Rf5+ 32. Kg4 Ree5 $11) 27. a4 Qe6 28. Rg4 Kh8 ({Black falls victim to the back rank weakness after} 28... Qe2 $2 29. Qxe2 Rxe2 30. Nf6+ Kh8 31. Rd8) 29. Rf4 Kg8 30. h4 Rc2 31. Kg2 h6 32. h5 {Pavel seemed to have run out of useful moves, and, possibly, the clock had become an issue as well.} Rcc8 33. Rdd4 $3 { Powerful centralization, reminiscent of the classic game Spassky-Fischer, Mar del Plata 1960.} Bc5 34. Rde4 Qd7 35. Rg4 $1 Kf8 {[#]} (35... Kh8 36. Nf6) 36. Ref4 {A little hesitation that spoils it a bit.} ({Already,} 36. Rxg7 $1 { was decisive:} Rxe4 (36... Kxg7 37. Qc3+ f6 38. Nxf6) 37. Rg8+ $1 Kxg8 38. Nf6+ Kg7 39. Nxd7 Re6 40. Qg4+ Kh7 41. Ne5 $1 Rxe5 42. Qxc8 Rxh5 43. Qd7 Kg6 44. f4 {and the rest is automatic.}) 36... Bd6 ({Pavel's best chance was} 36... Red8 37. Rxf7+ Qxf7 38. Rf4 Rd7 39. Rxf7+ Rxf7 40. Nf4 Kg8 41. Qd5 Re8 {White should win, but it'd take some time.}) 37. Rd4 (37. Rxg7 $1 Bxf4 38. Rg8+ { the same motif again.}) 37... Qb7 {[#]} 38. Rxg7 $1 {Finally Teimour lands a mortal blow.} Be5 (38... Kxg7 39. Rg4+ Kf8 40. Rg8+ Kxg8 41. Nf6+ Kf8 42. Qxb7 Rc7 43. Qd5 Re6 44. Qa8+ Kg7 45. Ne8+) 39. Rg8+ Kxg8 40. Nf6+ Bxf6 41. Rg4+ { Despite the uncertain finish, this game is a masterpiece by Radjabov.} 1-0

Levon Aronian, genio trabajando

Dmitry Jakovenko - Levon Aronian

[Event "FIDE Geneva Grand Prix 2017"] [Site "Geneva"] [Date "2017.07.07"] [Round "2"] [White "Jakovenko, Dmitry"] [Black "Aronian, Levon"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "C54"] [WhiteElo "2703"] [BlackElo "2809"] [Annotator "Alex Yermolinsky"] [PlyCount "102"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. O-O Nf6 5. d3 O-O 6. c3 a6 7. a4 Ba7 8. Re1 d6 9. h3 b5 $5 {An active move, first played in Shankland-Tari, 2017.} ({ Routine is} 9... Ne7 {played by Nakamura at least five times. Also, Carlsen, Karjakin and Leko tried their hand at it.}) 10. Bb3 b4 11. a5 Rb8 12. Nbd2 Be6 {[#]} 13. Bxe6 $6 {I'm far from being an expert on this structure, but it seems to be White shouldn't take on e6 unless he can immediately follow up with d3-d4.} ({In the above mentioned game Sam played} 13. Bc4) 13... fxe6 14. Nc4 Qe8 15. Be3 (15. d4 Qg6 16. dxe5 {fails to} Nxe4 $1) 15... Bxe3 16. Rxe3 Qg6 17. Ncd2 Nh5 18. Qf1 Rb5 19. Kh2 Qh6 20. Kg1 Qg6 21. Kh2 Qh6 22. Kg1 Kh8 { Levon says no to Dmitry's silent draw offer.} 23. d4 Nf4 24. h4 {[#]Move of the Day coming up.} g5 $3 {Directed against White's intended g2-g3, but how does one come up with such an idea. Simply put, Aronian is a genius.} 25. hxg5 Qh5 26. Qc4 (26. c4 Rbb8 27. dxe5 (27. d5 Nd4) 27... dxe5 28. g3 Nh3+ 29. Kg2 Rbd8 30. Rd1 Qg4 {puts White under considerable pressure.}) 26... exd4 27. cxd4 Nxa5 {Action all over the board.} 28. Qf1 {Jakovenko is not exactly brimming with confidence these days. Lots or rating points have been lost since his glory days of finishing third in the Grand Prix cycle two years ago.} ({ Perhaps, Dmitry could have survived} 28. Qxc7 Rxg5 29. Nxg5 Qxg5 {based on} 30. Rg3 Ne2+ 31. Kh2 Nxg3 32. fxg3 Qxd2 33. Rxa5 {and the open black king keeps Rf8 from joining the party.}) 28... h6 29. e5 d5 30. Rc1 c6 {[#]} 31. Ne1 $2 { More backward moves.} ({While} 31. gxh6 Rg8 32. g3 Rb7 33. Nh2 Rh7 {is indeed, bad for White,}) ({the right move,} 31. g6 $1 Rg8 32. Nh2 Qxg6 33. g3 {keeps him fighting on equal terms.}) 31... hxg5 32. Nd3 g4 33. Nxf4 Rxf4 34. Rd3 g3 $6 {Levon overdid it a bit.} ({There was no need for fireworks, when} 34... Rb7 35. g3 Rh7 {was there. After} 36. Qg2 {Black has a killer shot in} Qf5 37. Qf1 Rxf2 38. Qxf2 Rh1+) 35. Rxg3 Rh4 36. f4 Rh1+ 37. Kf2 Rxf1+ 38. Rxf1 {Suddenly it transpires Black is going to lose his queen back.} Nc4 {[#]} 39. Nb3 ({ The rook endgame after} 39. Nxc4 dxc4 40. Rh3 Qxh3 41. gxh3 c3 {is no picnic for White, but he can fight on with} 42. b3 $1 (42. Ke2 b3 43. Kd3 ({no time for} 43. bxc3 b2 44. Rb1 a5 45. Kd2 a4 46. Kc2 a3 $19) 43... c2 44. Kc3 a5 45. h4 a4 {has this hopeless look of gloom and doom.}) 42... a5 43. Ke3 Rd5 44. f5 exf5 45. Rxf5 Kg7 46. Rf1 c5 {is probably winning for Black though.}) 39... Qh4 40. Kf3 a5 41. Ra1 Qh5+ 42. Kf2 Nxb2 43. Rh3 (43. Nxa5 Nd1+ 44. Kg1 Qe2 { blocks the other white rook form ever reaching h1.}) 43... Qxh3 44. gxh3 a4 { It's over.} 45. Nc5 b3 46. f5 exf5 47. e6 Nc4 48. e7 Nd6 49. Nxa4 Kg7 50. Nc3 Rb8 51. Ra6 Kf7 0-1

Richard Rapport usó un sistema anticuado para defender la Ruy López Cerrada y Grischuk mostró por qué cayó en desuso

Alexander Grischuk - Richard Rapport

[Event "FIDE Geneva Grand Prix 2017"] [Site "Geneva"] [Date "2017.07.07"] [Round "2"] [White "Grischuk, Alexander"] [Black "Rapport, Richard"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "C97"] [WhiteElo "2761"] [BlackElo "2694"] [Annotator "Alex Yermolinsky"] [PlyCount "125"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 d6 8. c3 O-O 9. h3 Na5 10. Bc2 c5 11. d4 Qc7 12. d5 Nc4 13. b3 Nb6 14. a4 Bd7 15. a5 Nc8 16. c4 b4 17. Nbd2 Bd8 18. Nf1 Kh8 19. Ra2 Qb8 20. Be3 Ne7 21. Ng3 Qc8 22. Nh4 Neg8 23. Rf1 Ne8 24. Nf3 Bf6 25. Nh2 Ne7 26. Nh5 Ng6 27. Bb1 Qd8 28. Qc1 Kg8 29. Kh1 Bh4 {[#] Classic positional battles in the Closed Ruy Lopez often come to a head when White finally pushes f2-f4.} 30. f4 {Right here, right now.} exf4 31. Nxf4 Ne5 32. Nd3 $1 Nxd3 33. Bxd3 Nf6 {Rapport is seeking activity - perhaps a misdirected approach in such positions.} ({The thematic} 33... Bg3 { keeps an eye on the key e5-square.} 34. Bf4 $1 (34. Bf2 Be5 35. Nf3 f6 { is what Black has to be content with.}) 34... Bxf4 35. Qxf4 Qf6 36. Qg3 Qe5 37. Qh4 {White is better here, no doubt about that.}) 34. Bf4 (34. Rf3 Nh5 35. g4 Nf6 36. Bf4 Ne8 37. e5 {would be more clinical.}) 34... Nh5 $1 35. Bxd6 Ng3+ 36. Bxg3 Bxg3 37. Nf3 Qc7 38. Re2 f6 {[#] It seems Black might succeed in holding his dark square blockade, but Grischuk's next move cuts to the chase.} 39. e5 $3 Bxe5 40. Qc2 h6 41. Bh7+ Kh8 42. Bf5 {Strategically speaking, the battle has been decided, but White still has to be accurate putting the game away.} Be8 43. Nxe5 fxe5 44. Rfe1 Qxa5 45. Rxe5 Qc7 46. Qd2 Qd6 47. Re6 Qg3 48. Rxh6+ Kg8 49. Bh7+ Kh8 50. Bf5+ Kg8 51. Bh7+ Kh8 52. Be4+ Kg8 53. d6 $1 Ra7 54. Re6 Raf7 55. Kg1 Rf2 56. Qd1 Bf7 57. Bd5 g6 58. R6e3 Qg5 59. Bf3 Ra2 60. d7 Rd8 61. Re8+ Kg7 62. Rxd8 Qxd8 63. Qd6 {I don't know what makes this dated system of defending the Ruy Lopez attractive to Richard, but games like this can make anybody look bad. See Deep Blue-Kasparov (Game 2), 1997 or Anand-Carlsen, Norway Chess 2015 among numerous examples. There's simply no way a player of Grischuk's level would let Black get away with this.} 1-0

Shakhiryar Mamedyarov - Ernesto Inarkiev

[Event "FIDE Geneva Grand Prix 2017"] [Site "Geneva"] [Date "2017.07.07"] [Round "2"] [White "Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar"] [Black "Inarkiev, Ernesto"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "D30"] [WhiteElo "2800"] [BlackElo "2707"] [Annotator "Alex Yermolinsky"] [PlyCount "39"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 d5 3. c4 e6 4. Bg5 Bb4+ 5. Nbd2 {Shak specializes in obscure and risky gambit lines of the Queens Gambit Declined.} dxc4 6. e3 ({Main line runs} 6. Qc2 b5 7. a4 c6 8. Bxf6 gxf6 9. g3) 6... b5 7. a4 c6 8. Be2 (8. Qc2 Bb7 9. Be2 Nbd7 10. O-O O-O 11. b3 c3 12. Ne4 h6 13. Bh4 $5 (13. Bxf6 Nxf6 14. Nxc3 $11) 13... g5 14. Nxf6+ Nxf6 15. Bg3 c5 {was Nakamura-Morozevich, 2013.}) 8... Nbd7 9. O-O Qb6 10. Qc2 Bb7 11. b3 c3 12. Nb1 c5 13. Nxc3 cxd4 14. Nxb5 Rc8 (14... O-O {seems more natural.}) 15. Qb2 a6 16. a5 $1 Qc5 17. exd4 { Inarkiev played the opening reasonably well and stood to equalize until he chose an unfortunate square for his queen.} Qf5 $2 (17... Qe7 18. Ne5 $5 h6 ( 18... axb5 19. Bxb5) 19. Rfc1 O-O) (17... Qc2 18. Qxc2 Rxc2 19. Bd1 Rc8 20. Bd2 $1 Be7) 18. Bd2 Be7 19. Nc3 {[#]} O-O $4 {One move isn't a relaible indication of bad form, but how does a Super-GM blunder his queen like that?} (19... h6 20. b4 O-O 21. b5 $16) (19... e5 $5) 20. Nh4 1-0

Hou Yifan estuvo a un paso de ganar

Hou Yifan - Alexander Riazantsev

[Event "FIDE Geneva Grand Prix 2017"] [Site "Geneva"] [Date "2017.07.07"] [Round "2"] [White "Hou, Yifan"] [Black "Riazantsev, Alexander"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "D31"] [WhiteElo "2666"] [BlackElo "2654"] [Annotator "Alex Yermolinsky"] [PlyCount "91"] [EventDate "2017.??.??"] 1. c4 e6 2. Nc3 d5 3. d4 Be7 4. cxd5 exd5 5. Bf4 c6 6. e3 Bd6 7. Bg3 Ne7 8. Bd3 Bf5 9. Nge2 O-O 10. a3 a5 11. Rc1 Bxd3 12. Qxd3 Na6 13. Na4 Nc8 14. Nc5 Qe7 15. Qc3 Ra7 16. O-O Nc7 17. Nf4 Bxf4 18. Bxf4 Ne6 19. Bb8 Ra8 20. Bg3 Nb6 21. a4 Rfe8 22. b3 Nxc5 23. dxc5 Nd7 24. Rfe1 Nf8 25. h3 f6 26. Re2 Qf7 27. Rb2 Ng6 28. b4 axb4 29. Rxb4 Ne5 30. Rcb1 Re7 31. e4 Rd8 32. Rd1 h6 33. Qb3 Red7 34. exd5 cxd5 35. Rb1 Nc4 36. Rxb7 Nd2 37. Qb6 Nxb1 38. c6 Nc3 39. cxd7 Rxd7 40. Rxd7 Qxd7 41. a5 d4 42. a6 d3 {[#] A good, consistent game from Hou up to this point.} 43. Qb3+ $2 {A bad mistake, throwing away the win. Keep in mind, this was played after the time control. With this move, she loses her a-pawn and advantage.} (43. a7 d2 44. a8=Q+ Kh7 45. Qbb8 d1=Q+ 46. Kh2 Q1d5 {is just equal,}) ({but} 43. Bf4 $1 {would crown her efforts:} Nb5 (43... Ne2+ 44. Kh2 Nxf4 45. a7 d2 46. a8=Q+ Kh7 47. Qb1+ f5 48. Qf3 {etc.}) 44. Qb7 Qf5 45. Be3 { winning the knight and the game.}) 43... Kh8 44. a7 Ne2+ 45. Kh2 Qxa7 46. Qxd3 1/2-1/2

Las partidas para reproducir

Clasificación tras ronda 2

Nombre Puntos
1 Teimour Radjabov 2.0 / 2
2 Pentala Harikrishna 1.5 / 2
3 Shakhriyar Mamedyarov 1.5 / 2
4 Levon Aronian 1.5 / 2
5 Michael Adams 1.5 / 2
6 Alexander Grischuk 1.5 / 2
7 Pavel Eljanov 1.0 / 2
8 Li Chao 1.0 / 2
9 Boris Gelfand 1.0 / 2
10 Anish Giri 1.0 / 2
11 Peter Svidler 1.0 / 2
12 Ian Nepomniachtchi 1.0 / 2
13 Ernesto Inarkiev 0.5 / 2
14 Dmitry Jakovenko 0.5 / 2
15 Richard Rapport 0.5 / 2
16 Alexander Riazantsev 0.5 / 2
17 Hou Yifan 0.5 / 2
18 Salem Saleh 0.0 / 2

Las retransmisiones

(Mientras estén en marcha las partidas)

Enlace directo a la retransmisión

Se disputará entre el 5 y el 16 de julio. Del total de 24 jugadores seleccionados para disputar la serie del Grand Prix, en Ginebra competirán 18, tanto por los premios, como por los puntos del circuito, cuyos dos mejores clasificados se asegurarán plaza en el Torneo de Candidatos.

El lugar del encuentro será el hotel Richemond, en el centro de la ciudad de Ginebra (Suiza), a orillas del lago del mismo nombre.

Tras los dos primeros torneos del circuito, Shakhriyar Mamedyarov encabeza la general con 280 puntos. Ding Liren figura en la segunda posición con 240 puntos y Alexander Grischuk y Maxime Vachier-Lagrave los siguen con 211,4 puntos cada uno.

World Chess FIDE Grand Prix 2017

El World Chess FIDE Grand Prix 2017 es una serie de 4 torneos de ajedrez que forman parte del circuito del Campeonato del Mundo. Los dos mejores clasificados tendrán plaza en el Torneo de Candidatos 2018.

En cada torneo juegan 18 ajedrecistas. En total participarán 24 jugadores en el circuito y cada jugador participará en 3 torneos en total.

Los torneos se disputarán por sistema suizo a 9 rondas. Los jugadores recibirán 1 punto por victoria, medio punto por las tablas y cero puntos si caen derrotados.

Los puntos de Grand Prix determinarán la clasificación del circuito. Dos jugadores se han clasificado como finalistas del duelo por el Campeonato del Mundo 2016, 4 jugadores han llegado desde las semifinales en la Copa del Mundo 2015, 8 jugadores se han clasificado debido a sus valoraciones Elo, un jugador se ha clasificado a través de los torneos de la ACP y 9 ajedrecistas son designados directamente por Agon y FIDE (Deben tener una valoración Elo superior a 2700 puntos)

La bolsa de premios de cada torneo asciende a 130.000 euros, o sea que la serie de torneos del Grand Prixde totaliza 520.000 euros. 

Clasificación absoluta

# Nombre Elo Sharjah Moscú Ginebra Palma de Mallorca Total
1 Shakhriyar Mamedyarov  2800 140 140 0 0 280
2 Ding Liren  2783 70 170 0 0 240
3 Alexander Grischuk  2761 140 71.4 0 0 211.4
4 Maxime Vachier-Lagrave  2796 140 71.4 0 0 211.4
5 Hikaru Nakamura  2785 70 71.4 0 0 141.4
6 Hou Yifan 2666 7 71.4 0 0 78.4
7 Michael Adams 2736 70 3 0 0 73
8 Ian Nepomniachtchi 2732 70 3 0 0 73
9 Peter Svidler 2756 0 71.4 0 0 71.4
10 Teimour Radjabov  2724 0 71.4 0 0 71.4
11 Anish Giri  2771 0 71.4 0 0 71.4
12 Dmitry Jakovenko 2708 70 0 0 0 70
13 Francisco Vallejo Pons  2717 25 4 0 0 29
14 Richard Rapport 2694 25 0 0 0 25
15 Pavel Eljanov  2739 25 0 0 0 25
16 Li Chao  2720 25 0 0 0 25
17 Evgeny Tomashevsky  2706 3 20 0 0 23
18 Pentala Harikrishna  2737 0 20 0 0 20
19 Boris Gelfand 2728 0 20 0 0 20
20 Jon Ludvig Hammer 2628 3 7 0 0 10
21 Levon Aronian 2793 7 0 0 0 7
22 Salem Saleh    3 3 0 0 6
23 Alexander Riazantsev  2671 1 0 0 0 1
24 Ernesto Inarkiev  2707 0 1 0 0 1

Agon tiene la exclusiva de la retransmisión de las partidas de los torneos del Grand Prix de la FIDE y quiere que el sitio web oficial www.worldchess.com sea el único donde se puedan seguir en directo. Gracias a un acuerdo de colaboración entre Agon y ChessBase, nuestros clientes Premium podrán seguir las partidas en directo en Playchess.com.

Programa

Fecha Hora Actividad
05.07.2017   Inauguración
06.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 1
07.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 2
08.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 3
09.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 4
10.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 5
11.07.2017   Día de descanso
12.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 6
13.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 7
14.07.2017 14:00 CEST Ronda 8
15.07.2017 ?? CEST Ronda 9
    Clausura

Premios y puntuación

Puesto Premio Puntos Grand Prix
1 €20,000 170
2 €15,000 140
3 €12,000 110
4 €11,000 90
5 €10,000 80
6 €9,000 70
7 €8,000 60
8 €7,000 50
9 €6,000 40
10 €5,000 30
11 €4,250 20
12 €4,000 10
13 €3,750 8
14 €3,500 6
15 €3,250 4
16 €3,000 3
17 €2,750 2
18 €2,500 1

En caso de empate, los puntos se repartirían a partes iguales. No hay valoraciones de desempate.

En la clasificación absoluta, los puestos se determinan de la siguiente manera (en caso de empate a puntos):

  1. Puntos por duelos (en los tres torneos jugados)
  2. Cantidad de partidas con negras
  3. Cantidad de partidas ganadas
  4. Cantidad de victorias con negras
  5. Por sorteo

Todas las retransmisiones en Playchess.com a golpe de vista (Guía)

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Fotos: Maria Yassakova (World Chess)

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