Shanglei y Goryachkina, reyes juveniles 2014

por Sagar Shah
21/10/2014 – En la ronda final del absoluto, los GM más jóvenes se vieron las caras en una partida loca que terminó en tablas. Wei Yi, líder durante muchas rondas, vio como su compatriota Lu Shanglei ganaba una partida casi perfecta y el título con ella. La peruana Ann Chumpitaz fue bronce en la prueba femenina, cuyo oro ya era conocido. Reportaje...

ChessBase 15 - Mega package ChessBase 15 - Mega package

Find the right combination! ChessBase 15 program + new Mega Database 2019 with 7.6 million games and more than 70,000 master analyses. Plus ChessBase Magazine (DVD + magazine) and CB Premium membership for 1 year!

Más información...

Campeonato del Mundo de Ajedrez Juvenil 2014 en Pune (India)

Con su victoria en la ronda 12, Aleksandra Goryachkina igualó el registro de Ketino Kachiani de ganar el mundial juvenil dos años consecutivos. Mientras que la prueba femenina fue dominada completamente por la rusa de 16 años, la competición absoluta mantuvo la tensión hasta el último suspiro.

Apretones de manos por doquier. Comienza la ronda final.

En el primer tablero se enfrentaron Wei Yi y Jan-Krzysztof Duda. Ambos tenían 9 puntos.

Si buscamos en Google a Jan Krzysztof Duda:

Los dos GM más jóvenes de nuestro tiempo (2013-2014) se enfrentaron en el primer tablero en la última ronda, con el título en juego. ¡No podía resultar más apropiado!

Fue una locura de partida. Wei Yi comenzó jugando 4.Cg5 contra la Dfensa de los Dos Caballos, con unas complicaciones inimaginables.

No seve todos los días una posición tan compleja en una partida decisiva

Pero la partida derivó hacia la igualdad. Wei Yi intentó exprimir el punto a su favor, pero no lo consiguió.

[Event "WJCC U20 Open"] [Site "Pune"] [Date "2014.10.19"] [Round "13"] [White "Wei, Yi"] [Black "Duda, Jan-Krzysztof"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "C57"] [WhiteElo "2645"] [BlackElo "2599"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "114"] [EventDate "2014.??.??"] [EventCountry "IND"] {The first board of the final round of the World Junior and what do we find? One of the most romantic and crazy openings in chess!} 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 {No subtle play today: White goes all out! Wei Yi had played this once, in the Reykjavik Open 2013. So it might not have come as a complete surprise for Duda.} d5 5. exd5 Nd4 $5 {A very tricky move. But Wei Yi remained unfazed and kept playing at good speed, which means that he had come well prepared.} (5... Na5 {Usually Black goes for this move.}) 6. c3 b5 7. Bf1 {Of course the knight on d4 cannot move here because then b5 would hang. But in any case both the players have come to this game to create their own threats and not to respond to their opponent's!} Nxd5 8. cxd4 (8. Ne4 {was the safer way to play} Qh4 (8... Ne6 9. Bxb5+ Bd7 10. Bc4 $14) 9. Ng3 Nc6 10. Bxb5 $14) 8... Qxg5 9. Bxb5+ Kd8 (9... Bd7 10. Bxd7+ Kxd7 11. O-O $16 {gives White a clear advantage.}) 10. Qf3 exd4 11. Bc6 (11. Qxf7 Bd6 $19 {gives Black a winning position because the black pieces are just so active.}) 11... Nf4 ( 11... Nb4 {looked like another possibility.} 12. Bxa8 Nc2+ 13. Kd1 (13. Kf1 Nxa1 $17) 13... Bg4 (13... Nxa1 14. d3 Qc5 15. Na3 $16) 14. Kxc2 Bxf3 15. Bxf3 $14 {gives White a small advantage.}) 12. O-O (12. Bxa8 $2 {Taking the rook is not so good.} Bg4 13. Qc6 Nd3+ 14. Kf1 Bd6 $17 {Black has a very dangerous initiative.}) (12. g3 {was what has happened before.} Qc5 13. Nc3 $1 Nd3+ $1 14. Qxd3 Qxc6 15. Qxd4+ Bd6 $11) 12... Bg4 $1 13. Re1 (13. Bxa8 Bxf3 14. Bxf3 Bd6 $19 {White has not enough compensation for a queen over here.}) 13... Bd6 14. Qe4 $1 {Once again threatening a mate on e8.} (14. Bxa8 $2 Bxf3 15. Bxf3 Nd3 $19) 14... Bd7 $1 15. d3 (15. Bxd7 Kxd7 $19 {and with the rook coming to e8 Black is just winning.}) 15... Bxc6 16. Qxc6 Qd5 $1 {It was necessary for Black to exchange queens, as his king is just too weak on d8. Once the queens are exchanged the king that was weak in the center, now becomes a strength.} 17. Qxd5 Nxd5 {If someone is better in this position, then it has to be Black. But White's disadvantage is not so significant and hence he can hold on.} 18. Nd2 {Looking to plonk the knight onto the weakened c4 square.} Kd7 19. Nc4 Rhe8 20. Bd2 c5 21. Kf1 Rac8 22. g3 Nb6 23. Nxd6 (23. Rac1 {looked much more preferable, but the position is nothing more than equal.}) 23... Kxd6 24. Rxe8 Rxe8 25. Rc1 Kd5 {Black has a small edge thanks to his centralized king, but the problem is that he cannot do much damange and hence the game will be drawn pretty soon.} 26. b3 Re6 27. f4 f5 28. Kf2 Rh6 29. Kg2 Re6 30. Kf3 Rh6 31. Kg2 Re6 32. Kf3 Rh6 33. Rh1 {At this point Lu Shanglei was already winning his game. That meant that Wei Yi had to continue if he wanted to win the title. But there is absolutely no chance to play for a win in the position. It's just dead equal.} Nd7 34. h3 Nb8 35. Re1 Nc6 36. Kg2 Re6 37. Rxe6 Kxe6 38. a3 h5 39. Kf3 g6 40. Ke2 Kd5 41. Kd1 Ne7 42. Ke2 Ke6 43. b4 cxb4 44. Bxb4 Nc6 45. Bf8 Kd5 46. Kd2 a5 47. a4 Nd8 48. Be7 Ne6 49. Kc2 Nc5 50. Bd8 Nxa4 51. Bxa5 Nc5 52. Bb4 Ne6 53. Be7 Kc6 54. Kb3 Kb5 55. Bf6 Nc5+ 56. Kc2 Ne6 57. Kb3 Nc5+ {A crazy opening, that led to great excitement. But as is always the case with such sharp openings, they more often than not peter out to equality if both sides play accurately. More than anything the players must be commended for their brave opening choice in such an important game.} 1/2-1/2

El momento en el que los jugadores acuerdan tablas

Vladimir Fedoseev, con negras, jugó una línea de moda de la Bogoindia. Igualó en la apertura, pero poco a poco fue empeorando su posición. En un momento dado, Kamil tuvo ventaja tangible, pero algunas imprecisiones permitieron al ruso aguantar las tablas.

En el segundo tablero luchaban Kamil Dragun (8.5) y Vladimir Fedoseev (9.0)

[Event "WJCC U20 Open"] [Site "Pune"] [Date "2014.10.19"] [Round "13"] [White "Dragun, Kamil"] [Black "Fedoseev, Vladimir"] [Result "1/2-1/2"] [ECO "E11"] [WhiteElo "2545"] [BlackElo "2677"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "79"] [EventDate "2014.??.??"] [EventCountry "IND"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 Bb4+ 4. Bd2 Qe7 5. g3 Bxd2+ {The modern treatment of the Bogo Indian main line.} (5... Nc6 {used to be played a lot here, but lately people have realized that} 6. Nc3 {is a dangerous move.}) 6. Qxd2 { Taking with the queen is the most logical in order to keep the option open for the knight to develop on c3.} Nc6 7. Nc3 d5 8. cxd5 (8. Bg2 {is the other option, but Black seems to be doing fine after} dxc4 9. Ne5 O-O 10. Nxc6 bxc6 11. Bxc6 Rb8 $11) 8... exd5 9. Bg2 O-O 10. O-O Rd8 (10... Bg4 {is the other main option in this position.}) 11. Rfe1 {This is a novelty but a pretty natural move.} Bf5 12. Qf4 Be4 {Black has equalised easily in the opening but we still have a fighting game ahead.} 13. Rac1 a6 $6 {This move was completely unnecessary. It weakens the queenside and allows the knight to plonk itself on c5.} (13... h6 {was much better.}) 14. a3 h6 15. Na4 Rd6 $5 {Defending the c6 knight and preparing to kick the white knight with b6 when it comes to c5.} 16. Nc5 b6 (16... Nd8 17. Qe3 $14) 17. Nd3 (17. Nb7 Re6 18. Bh3 Nh5 19. Qd2 (19. Qg4 Bxf3 20. Qxf3 Nxd4 $17) 19... Rf6 $11) 17... Nd8 18. b4 a5 19. Qd2 Ne6 20. b5 $1 {This move fixes the weakness on c6 and also renders c7 a backward pawn. Black slowly drifts into an inferior position.} Rdd8 21. Qc3 Qe8 22. a4 Bh7 23. Bh3 (23. Nfe5 {looks equally strong.} Ne4 24. Qb2 Rac8 25. Nc6 Rd6 26. f3 Nf6 27. e4 $16 {and White has a crushing advantage.}) 23... Ne4 24. Qc6 (24. Qb2 { looks stronger. The idea is to of course take on e6 and then on c7.} Rac8 25. Nfe5 $14 {and once again the idea is f3 followed by a later e4.}) 24... N4g5 25. Nxg5 Nxg5 26. Qxe8+ (26. Bg2 {was stronger.} Bxd3 27. exd3 Qxc6 28. Rxc6 Ne6 29. Re5 Nxd4 30. Rxc7 {and Black's defensive task is really difficult.}) 26... Rxe8 27. Bg2 $6 (27. Bd7 $1 Re7 (27... Bxd3 28. Bxe8 Rxe8 29. h4 $1 $16) 28. Bc6 (28. Rxc7 $2 Bxd3 $19) 28... Rd8 29. Nf4 $16 {White has a lot of pressure.}) 27... Bxd3 $1 28. exd3 Rxe1+ 29. Rxe1 Rd8 {Now the position is too static for White to create many threats. His c7 and d5 are the two weakness which can be easily defended. And as the pawns are on d3 and d4, White has no meaningful breaks in the position.} 30. Rc1 Rd7 31. Rc6 Kf8 (31... Ne6 32. Bh3 Rd6 33. Rxd6 cxd6 34. Bxe6 fxe6 $11 {would have been an immediate draw. But the lust for a gold medal often makes people to go for objectively dubious decisions.}) 32. f4 Nh7 33. Kf2 Ke8 34. g4 Nf6 35. Bf3 (35. g5 hxg5 36. fxg5 Nh5 $11) 35... Ng8 36. g5 hxg5 37. Bg4 Rd6 38. Rxd6 (38. Rxc7 Nf6 39. Bf3 gxf4 $11) 38... cxd6 39. fxg5 Kf8 40. Kg3 $11 {The white king has no entry points and bishop has no pawns to attack. A draw looks like a logical result of the game.} 1/2-1/2

Lu Shanglei es un luchador, como quedó demostrado al plantear la Defensa Holandesa contra el 1.d4 de Indjic. Las blancas tenían un posición bastante segura tras la apertura, pero solo un error de Indjic permitió que el chino tomase la iniciativa. Lu Shanglei no soltó la presa y ganó la partida y el cetro mundial con ella.

Todos los ojos estaban puestos en la lucha del tercer tablero entre Alexander Indjic (8.5) y Lu Shanglei (9.0)

[Event "WJCC U20 Open"] [Site "Pune"] [Date "2014.10.19"] [Round "13"] [White "Indjic, Aleksandar"] [Black "Lu, Shanglei"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A80"] [WhiteElo "2548"] [BlackElo "2544"] [Annotator "Sagar Shah"] [PlyCount "62"] [EventDate "2014.??.??"] [EventCountry "IND"] 1. d4 f5 $5 {What a brave choice by Lu Shanglei! Playing the Dutch shows that he is going for a win at all costs.} 2. Nc3 $5 {Trying for a sharp and double edged battle.} Nf6 3. Bg5 d5 $5 4. e3 g6 5. h4 Bg7 6. h5 Be6 (6... Nxh5 7. Rxh5 gxh5 8. Qxh5+ Kf8 9. Nf3 $36) 7. h6 Bf8 {Black is being pushed back and White has a very comfortable and in fact a good advantage} 8. f4 $6 {Completely unnecssary} (8. Nf3 Nbd7 9. Be2 Bf7 10. Bf4 $16 {White has excellent control over the e5 square.}) 8... Bf7 9. Nf3 e6 10. Ne2 Be7 11. Nc1 Ng4 $6 (11... Ne4 {looked much more normal.} 12. Bxe7 Qxe7 13. Nd3 Nc6 $11 (13... c5 14. Nxc5 Nxc5 15. dxc5 Qxc5 16. Qd4 $16)) 12. Qd2 O-O 13. Bxe7 Qxe7 14. Nd3 Nd7 15. Nf2 (15. Be2 $14 {was a simple developing move.}) 15... Ndf6 16. c3 c5 17. Nxg4 Ne4 18. Qc2 $2 {This is a horrible mistake. But what I didn't understand was why White let Black take on g4 and alter the pawn structure in his favour.} (18. Nf6+ $1 {That is the move that would have given Black absolutely no advantage in the position as the pawn structure would remain symmetrical.} Qxf6 19. Qc2 $11) (18. Qd1 {was also a fine move.} fxg4 19. Ne5 cxd4 $2 20. Qxd4 $1 $16) 18... fxg4 19. Ne5 cxd4 {It is an interesting question: what exactly did White miss in this position? Was it Qb4+ after cxd4 or Be8 after exd4? Your guess is as good as mine.} 20. exd4 (20. cxd4 Qb4+ $19 {is simply winning.}) 20... Be8 $1 {a nice move by Lu Shanglei. Not only does it attack the f4 pawn but also makes the bishop more active on the e8-a4 diagonal.} 21. Qc1 (21. Nd3 Bb5 { would already make the f4 pawn difficult to defend.}) (21. O-O-O Rxf4) 21... Ng3 22. Rh2 (22. Rg1 Qh4 $19) 22... g5 $1 {If you watch carefully, ever since the Lu Shanglei got the initiative he keeps making active moves in order to increase his advantage. Every move made by him is a threat, and soon the opponent collapses.} 23. Bd3 (23. Nxg4 Rxf4) 23... Rxf4 {The game is effectively over.} 24. Qd2 (24. Qe3 {is met by a cute trick} Nf1 $1 25. Bxf1 Re4 $19) 24... Ba4 $1 {A strong move which not only prevents White from 0-0-0 but also clears the way for the rook on a8 to join in the party.} 25. b3 (25. -- Qf6) 25... Raf8 26. Qe3 (26. bxa4 Rf1+ 27. Bxf1 Rxf1#) (26. O-O-O Rf2 $19 { [%cal Ge7a3]}) 26... Nf1 27. Qg1 (27. Bxf1 Rxf1+ $19) 27... Nxh2 28. Qxh2 Qc7 $1 {Not relaxing right until the end.} 29. Kd2 Rf2+ 30. Be2 Rxe2+ 31. Kxe2 Qxc3 {A fantastic game by Lu Shanglei. What was particularly impressive was that once he held the initiative he never let it go.} 0-1

Lu Shanglei se ha coronado 53º Campeón del Mundo Juvenil

Lu Shanglei sin duda mereció el triunfo. Terminó sin conocer la derrota, con 7 victorias y 6 tablas. Jugó contra 9 GM, 4 de ellos con Elo por encima de 2600. Su rendimiento llegó a 2726 y ganó 33 puntos Elo.

Desilusionado por no haber conseguido el oro, largamente acariciado: Wei Yi tras sus tablas de la última ronda. Jugó un torneo excelente y era líder en solitario tras la ronda 11, pero su derrota contra Fedoseev en la 12 dio un giro a sus posibilidades.

Aleksandra Goryachkina (izquierda) hizo tablas en la ronda final contra Anna Iwanow y terminó con 11/13. Se llevó la medalla de oro con 1,5 puntos de ventaja sobre sus perseguidoras más cercanas

¿Ajedrez a la ciega? ¡Conservar el título mundial no es un logro menor!

Sarasadat Khademalsharieh (izquierda) ganó a Srija Seshadri y terminó con 9.5/13 y se colgó la medalla de plata. Les recordamos que ChessBase llamó su atención sobre ella hace 5 años

En 2009 Sarasadat fue Campeona de Asia Sub-12 con 11 años

Ann Chumpitaz (izquierda) entabló con Sarvinoz Kurbonoeva y ganó la medalla de bronce con 9.5/13.
Chumpitaz (2201) ganó unos impresionantes 65 puntos Elo en el torneo.

Ceremonia de clausura

Pratibha Patil fue la invitada de honor en la ceremonia de clausura. Fue presidenta de India entre 2007 y 2012, primera mujer en llegar a ese puesto.

Los dignatarios en el lugar de honor (de izquierda a derecha): vicepresidente del comité organizador Siddharth Mayur, vicepresidente de la FIDE D.V. Sundar, presidente del comité organizador Aniruddha Deshpande, presidente de la federación india Venketrama Raja, expresidenta de India Pratibha Patil, presidente de la MCA Ashok Jain, director ejecutivo de la federación india Bharat Singh Chauhan, secretario de la federación india V. Hariharan, tesorero de la federación india Ravindra Dongre.

Trofeos para los ganadores, con forma de caballo y colores de la bandera india

El podio de la prueba absoluta: oro para Lu Shanglei (centro),
plata para Wei Yi (izquierda) y bronce para Vladimir Fedoseev (derecha)

Lu Shanglei recibió un cheuqe de 150.000 rupias (unos 2500 USD) y también un puesto en la próxima Copa del Mundo FIDE

Sarasadat Khadelmalsharieh, plata; Aleksandra Goryachkina, oro; Ann Chumpitaz, bronce

Un cheque de 150.000 rupias (unos 2500 USD) y una plaza en la próxima Copa del Mundo FIDE también para Aleksandra. Los puestos 2 y 3 de ambas secciones recibieron 100.000 rupias y 50.000 rupias respectivamente.

Los dos ganadores, Aleksandra Goryachkina y Lu Shanglei con la expresidenta de India

El entrenador de China Li Wenliang tiene motivo para estar orgulloso de sus pupilos. Tras haber ganado el oro olímpico en Tromso, es un buen año para el ajedrez de ese país.

Un eufórico Farrukh Amonatov, entrenador del equipo ruso, posa con sus ajedrecistas más destacados

Los polacos tuvieron un buena actuación: Kamil Dragun fue 6º y Jan-Krzysztof Duda, 4º

Vidit Gujarathi, que terminó 5º, recibió un trofeo especial como mejor indio

Padmini Rout con sus orgullosos padres. Acabó cuarta y fue la mejor india en la prueba femenina.

Shardul Gagare y Rucha Pujari ganaron el premio a los mejores jugadores de Maharashtra

El equipo de comentaristas fue agasajado por su trabajo durante 13 días

El reportero Sagar Shah y la fotógrafa Amruta Mokal con el ganador absoluto

Clasificación final del torneo absoluto (13 rondas)

Fav Tit. Nombre FED Elo Pts.  Des2 
Elo+/-
1 13 GM Lu Shanglei CHN 2533 10.0 100.5
33.2
2 3 GM Wei Yi CHN 2641 9.5 100.0
7.8
3 1 GM Fedoseev Vladimir RUS 2661 9.5 100.0
0.1
4 6 GM Duda Jan-Krzysztof POL 2599 9.5 93.5
0.0
5 4 GM Vidit Santosh Gujrathi IND 2635 9.0 94.5
-10.1
6 12 GM Dragun Kamil POL 2546 9.0 92.5
0.7
7 28 IM Narayanan Srinath IND 2443 9.0 91.5
17.9
8 19 IM Karthikeyan Murali IND 2499 9.0 85.5
-1.6
9 18 IM Ghosh Diptayan IND 2508 8.5 97.0
7.7
10 37 IM Bai Jinshi CHN 2406 8.5 95.5
34.2
11 7 GM Bok Benjamin NED 2591 8.5 93.5
-12.9
12 30 IM Kriebel Tadeas CZE 2428 8.5 93.0
14.4
13 2 GM Van Kampen Robin NED 2641 8.5 90.0
-21.0
14 20 GM Bajarani Ulvi AZE 2496 8.5 88.5
-2.6
15 36 FM Csonka Balazs HUN 2409 8.5 85.0
6.6
16 5 GM Cori Jorge PER 2612 8.0 98.5
-3.5
17 8 GM Grigoryan Karen H. ARM 2591 8.0 98.0
-5.1
18 25 IM Tari Aryan NOR 2450 8.0 94.5
14.7
19 10 GM Oparin Grigoriy RUS 2552 8.0 94.5
-8.8
20 11 GM Kovalev Vladislav BLR 2548 8.0 93.5
-9.5
21 15 GM Antipov Mikhail Al. RUS 2524 8.0 92.5
-3.6
22 22 IM Ducarmon Quinten NED 2487 8.0 89.5
-3.4
23 9 GM Indjic Aleksandar SRB 2554 8.0 89.0
-16.3
24 14 GM Abasov Nijat AZE 2528 8.0 88.0
-19.4
25 27 IM Das Sayantan IND 2445 8.0 88.0
-1.5
26 34 IM Gagare Shardul IND 2419 8.0 88.0
-8.3
27 26 IM Prasanna Raghuram Rao IND 2447 8.0 85.0
-10.9
28 66   Gahan M.G. IND 2252 8.0 81.5
43.0

Clasificación completa...

Clasificación final del torneo femenino (13 rondas)

Fav Tit Nombre FED Elo Pts.  Des 
Elo+/-
1 1 WGM Goryachkina Aleksandra RUS 2430 11.0 97.0
11.4
2 3 WGM Khademalsharieh Sarasadat IRI 2366 9.5 98.5
12.0
3 15 WIM Chumpitaz Ann PER 2201 9.5 97.0
65.0
4 6 WGM Padmini Rout IND 2331 9.0 98.5
19.8
5 5 WIM Zhai Mo CHN 2339 8.5 95.5
-13.6
6 9 WIM Iwanow Anna POL 2279 8.5 95.0
10.0
7 11 WIM Ibrahimova Sabina AZE 2271 8.5 92.0
1.8
8 2 IM Arabidze Meri GEO 2409 8.5 89.5
-16.6
9 14 WIM Kurbonboeva Sarvinoz UZB 2212 8.5 81.0
-27.2
10 30 WFM Srija Seshadri IND 2099 8.0 91.0
80.8
11 19 WFM Gevorgyan Maria ARM 2160 8.0 89.0
8.4
12 10 FM Brunello Marina ITA 2275 8.0 89.0
-20.8
13 20   Gelip Ioana ROU 2154 8.0 86.5
15.4
14 23 WIM Fronda Jan Jodilyn PHI 2127 8.0 81.5
-5.6
15 7 WIM Ni Shiqun CHN 2312 8.0 80.0
-50.2
16 4 FM Pustovoitova Daria RUS 2354 7.5 101.5
-13.0
17 18 WIM Ivana Maria Furtado IND 2165 7.5 92.5
53.6
18 41 WIM Gu Tianlu CHN 2055 7.5 91.5
127.2
19 21 WIM Frayna Janelle Mae PHI 2140 7.5 90.5
27.2
20 13 WFM Petrukhina Irina RUS 2218 7.5 86.5
-14.6
21 8 WIM Nguyen Thi Mai Hung VIE 2299 7.5 86.0
-50.8
22 28 WFM Saranya J IND 2107 7.5 83.5
-3.4
23 25 WFM Vaishali R IND 2120 7.5 79.5
-1.6
24 33 WFM Mahalakshmi M IND 2083 7.5 77.0
0.4

Clasificación completa...

Reportajes en vídeo de las rondas 12 y 13 por Vijay Kumar

Todas las partidas en formato PGN: Absoluto - Femenino (cortesía de TWIC)

Programa

Actividad Hora Fecha
Inauguración 19:00 05.10.2014
Reunión técnica 22:00 05.10.2014
Ronda 1 15:00 06.10.2014
Ronda 2 15:00 07.10.2014
Ronda 3 15:00 08.10.2014
Ronda 4 15:00 09.10.2014
Ronda 5 15:00 10.10.2014
Ronda 6 15:00 11.10.2014
Ronda 7 15:00 12.10.2014
Día de descanso 13.10.2014
Ronda 8 15:00 14.10.2014
Ronda 9 15:00 15.10.2014
Ronda 10 15:00 16.10.2014
Ronda 11 15:00 17.10.2014
Ronda 12 15:00 18.10.2014
Ronda 13 10:00 19.10.2014
Clausura 18:00 19.10.2014
Salida 20.10.2014

Información: Sagar Shah
Fotografías: Amruta Mokal

Enlaces




Ajedrecista indio con dos normas de MI. Periodista especializado en ajedrez.
Discussion and Feedback Join the public discussion or submit your feedback to the editors


Comentar

Normas sobre los comentarios

 
 

¿Aún no eres usuario? Registro